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farn87
01-22-2008, 10:21 PM
hello.. i am interested in a career in the finance industry. would a degree in applied mathematics be of use in getting into a career as such?

lemonwguitar
01-23-2008, 09:23 AM
i have a similar concern too...though i'm not say, totally wanting to get into the finance industry, but it is a choice for me...i'm looking at courses like applied maths, pure maths or quantitative finance...that is if i read in nus...

i'm not sure but i think it helps..more or less?

nus applied maths course: "Topics offered include financial mathematics, optimization and operations research, mathematical modelling, numerical methods and simulations, coding and cryptography, computational biology and many others."

maybe it depends more on what are the modules u choose....?

farn87
01-24-2008, 01:49 PM
Erm, thanks for replying. The modules that one take, will ultimately decides which area that he/she specializes in.
However the question lies in whether jobs explicitly state in their requirements eg. Degree in Applied Mathematics specializing in Finance as part of applying for the job. The problem is that I have yet to find one stating as such in the Classified section in the Straits Times..

truewt
02-28-2008, 04:45 PM
Hi guys.

I'm personally also into the same predicament. But I _THINK_ I've gotten over it.

I was unsure whether I would go into Mathematics, then decide on my career path, be it finance or not. Or should I take a degree in Mathematics (with Finance specialisation).

I've came to the conclusion to take up the first choice as I'm really interested in Mathematics as opposed to Finance. I will specialise if the need arises (when my thinking change). But that's 2 years later!

Okay, back to topic, I personally feel that a Mathematics degree will be sufficient to work in the finance sector. Because with a Mathematics degree, employers most probably have an impression that you are good with numbers, is analytical and logical blah blah. The specialisation (QF), or maybe the specialisation modules, will definitely be a plus point to the yourself on the employer. But, in all seriousness, don't you think the most important is the piece of degree scroll you hold? It is where first impressions are made. In addition, I feel that OJT (On-Job-Training) will teach you more than whatever you learn in the modules in university.

Regards,
HT

lemonwguitar
02-29-2008, 07:53 AM
my dad went to the education fair ytd and brought back info from some oversea unis including newcastle and UNSW. I read those info esp the courses on maths, it seems that those schools do not require you to state your specialisation in your first year. You jus go into the school of maths first and start studying, and decide on your spec in the next year.

then i was thinking, do nus offer the same thing? if yes then why didnt we realise? i recall reading from the nus website that no students could offer a double major from maths/applied maths/q finance...does that mean that these spec actually consists largely of the same modules, and esp when q finance's entry requirement states that a few modules mus be taken and passed?

so, does nus actually allow us to go in there and take the "common" modules first, and decide later, which field do we really want to go into?

farn87
02-29-2008, 10:35 AM
hey.. thanks for the replies so far.

According to NUS website, a student is required to take a set of modules to qualifiy entry to qf spec. This means that after the 1st year, one could apply for the qf spec and if all the requirements are met( also depending on the number of seats availiable slots for the course), he gets into the qf spec course. Im not sure about the finance and operations side but i have a feeling that these other 2 courses are different from qf, in terms of getting into the course..

btw u guys, matriculating into NUS this August too? hehe

truewt
02-29-2008, 01:46 PM
Hi guys,

Sorry for not responding earlier.

NUS allows you to take any common modules you want when you enter, regardless of whichever year, you can actually take any modules you want to. They have a bidding system to ballot their modules accordingly. Hence, for certain popular modules, you might need to pay more credits to stand a higher chance of getting into that module.

Having said that, in NUS, every year, you will fill in some sort of a form, which indicates your primary major, then your secondary major (or any minors), but this doesn't restrict the modules you can apply for. You can actually apply for any modules you want. However, to be able to graduate with a certain major, you will need to satisfy certain criterions (ie modules taken in a specific group). Hence, it is up to yourself when do you want to study the modules in which year of your study in NUS.

NUS's approach allows you lots of freedom to choose your modules. Even within the specific group of modules you want to study in, there is a huge variety of modules and you need not study all of them. Hence, comes the specialisation. However, the specialisation (for eg, if you took lots of Finance modules) is not reflected in your scroll upon graduation.

Oh and another point to note, for eg in the system, you key Physics as your primary major (the form you key in every year), but chose to study Mathematics modules, the subsequent year you can continue to put Physics as your primary major but continue Mathematics. When you file for graduation, you just fill in Mathematics as the major you are graduating from. Since you satisfy the graduation requirements for Mathematics, you will be given the degree in Mathematics :D

This is how the Faculty of Science works, so I cannot be sure about the rest of the faculties in NUS :P

Side note, QF is a pretty demanding course. I've considered applying for it (provided my results are good in year 1 :) ), but chances seem low for locals. According to my friend currently in NUS, last year's intake for QF was 35, with 33 PRCs and 2 locals...

EDIT: Ah.. forgot to answer your last question. I'm not matriculating this year :( one more year to ORD :(

farn87
03-01-2008, 01:25 PM
ah yes.. thanks for the info.. hmm 33 prc 2 locals for qf course? whoa... guess i'll abandon any dreams of entering the qf course..lol

truewt
03-01-2008, 01:50 PM
ah yes.. thanks for the info.. hmm 33 prc 2 locals for qf course? whoa... guess i'll abandon any dreams of entering the qf course..lol

If you can work really hard during your first year, by all means try. But the CPA required is really very high, something like >4.5

lemonwguitar
03-05-2008, 03:51 PM
whoa. does that mean ppl who come out with that cert really earns a lot? haha. i think it still depends on the individual. since every job has an interview, perhaps we can take those finance modules too, but graduate with a diff degree and tell them we're quite equipped?

truewt
03-06-2008, 12:46 AM
You can definitely do that. But still, first impression matters a lot, IMO though.

And from what I heard through NUS lecturers, the QF course is so competitive, that even before you graduate, many companies will be sourcing you to be part of them.

farn87
03-07-2008, 10:33 AM
wow.. well, all i can say is that its worth the try.. if prc people can do it, so can we locals :)

truewt
03-07-2008, 10:48 PM
Yes.. Do go for it! Good luck!

mirramax
03-17-2008, 09:28 PM
SMU offers a QF course too. How do they measure up to each other?

farn87
03-19-2008, 12:01 AM
erm.. im not sure about that. Well anyone knows about it?

If you ask me to guess, Id think that quality wise, NUS would be much better off in terms of experience.
QF involves 3 schools namely FOS, sch of biz and sch of computing so im guessing that to fuse all these 3 different areas together requires a lot of coordination on the part of the course planner. Hence, NUS would be much better off in this area.

On the other hand, Id reckon NUS to have a temporary advantage. SMU has a smaller base consisting mainly the core requirements of the QF. An analogy would be a smaller basket of spices compared to a bigger one that contains other items such as fruits etc. To make a soup, the smaller basket enables you to find the necessary ingredients faster and more efficient.

Hence, i predict it would be a matter of time till the coveted QF course becomes more valued at SMU than NUS.

PS: Sorry for crapping so much to answer a simple qn. :)

mirramax
03-19-2008, 12:22 PM
Hi. Thanks for your guidance! i found it rather introspective and it managed to drive the point across.

personally, i have a similar reasoning. NUS QF students might benefit from the foundation studies in mathematics but SMu students might too benefit from the more focused syllabus at SMU.

allow me to explain. as Quants, we would be primarily concerned with calculus and statistics and not pure mathematics per se. correct me if im wrong here. SMU students only study statistics and calculus and not mechanics and pure math so we might benefit from this.

any one with experience care to comment?

farn87
03-21-2008, 12:31 AM
bah.. I have no experience..Well, once school starts in Aug i'll inform u ya? hehe

LeGentil
03-26-2008, 11:02 AM
Hi. You guys have been very informative about NUS courses. Do you all have any idea is NTU Mathematical Sciences course good? Cause they have a new building and poached a lot of professors from NUS too. I hope to know if NUS or NTU is better. Thanks!

xingxian
04-01-2008, 01:32 PM
not necessary i think. it depends on the market demand instead of how hard the course is.

spencer
02-15-2009, 01:39 AM
Hi. You guys have been very informative about NUS courses. Do you all have any idea is NTU Mathematical Sciences course good? Cause they have a new building and poached a lot of professors from NUS too. I hope to know if NUS or NTU is better. Thanks!

Of course not. Your CV got binned straight away if you are from NTU

MOD Ashearo Edit: Please do not post unless you have something constructive to add.

spencer
02-15-2009, 01:53 AM
Of course not. Your CV got binned straight away if you are from NTU

MOD Ashearo Edit: Please do not post unless you have something constructive to add.

Ashearo, you need to understand that TARGET SCHOOL is very important in both Banking and Markets, much more important than the course he's talking about.

All my advice here are top notch.

Ashearo
02-15-2009, 01:57 AM
Ashearo, you need to understand that TARGET SCHOOL is very important in both Banking and Markets, much more important than the course he's talking about.

All my advice here are top notch.

Then show us how it is important, instead of binning everything that isnt NUS. Why do they bin it? What kind of factors cause such employers to immediately bin it? Do they not consider other factors outside of academia?

spencer
02-15-2009, 02:10 AM
Then show us how it is important, instead of binning everything that isnt NUS. Why do they bin it? What kind of factors cause such employers to immediately bin it? Do they not consider other factors outside of academia?
We have 10000+++ CVs . Only 1-2% of ppl get interviews.

LockT31W
02-15-2009, 03:23 AM
The selling point about target schools is really about their selectivity, because then the rigorous admission process into these schools is already a useful filter for the companies. That's how philosphy grads from Princeton get IB jobs.

But this logically means that we shouldn't "bin" certain highly selective faculties of non-selective schools. NUS Law, ChemE come to mind. While they obviously don't exactly match the very best degrees like Cambridge law or ChemE, they do come close. This of course assumes that the employers in question are well aware of the selectivity of these faculties in NUS - which really excludes foreign employers.

spencer
02-15-2009, 04:42 AM
The selling point about target schools is really about their selectivity, because then the rigorous admission process into these schools is already a useful filter for the companies. That's how philosphy grads from Princeton get IB jobs.

But this logically means that we shouldn't "bin" certain highly selective faculties of non-selective schools. NUS Law, ChemE come to mind. While they obviously don't exactly match the very best degrees like Cambridge law or ChemE, they do come close. This of course assumes that the employers in question are well aware of the selectivity of these faculties in NUS - which really excludes foreign employers.

NUS Chem Engg?! ...

Sorry but NUS in general is not selective, and don't think Chem Engg is any where called selective. Tell me % of AAAA people got rejected from Chem Engg?

yanshuo
02-15-2009, 08:22 AM
Of course not. Your CV got binned straight away if you are from NTU


We have 10000+++ CVs . Only 1-2% of ppl get interviews.


And this is by which company?

yanshuo
02-15-2009, 08:23 AM
NUS Chem Engg?! ...

Sorry but NUS in general is not selective, and don't think Chem Engg is any where called selective. Tell me % of AAAA people got rejected from Chem Engg?

What is your definition of "selective"?

spencer
02-16-2009, 05:11 AM
And this is by which company?

Normal front/middle office for investment banks.

spencer
02-16-2009, 05:11 AM
What is your definition of "selective"?

Say, % of AAAA rejected. And how about personal statements, interviews, etc

spencer
02-16-2009, 05:27 AM
And this is by which company?

I don't know anyone who's from NTU. I know a girl from Tufts who's working at US sales, another guy from Tufts is an MD in investment banking.

williamparkar
04-03-2010, 02:34 PM
I've came to the conclusion to take up the first choice as I'm really interested in Mathematics as opposed to Finance. I will specialise if the need arises (when my thinking change). But that's 2 years later!

Mod Haecceity Edit: Link Removed. Please note that no advertising is allowed.

hohoheha
07-17-2010, 11:00 AM
Hi, I kinda need a lil advice on QF major.

Honestly, I was wondering, based on past years statistics, what the chances are for local students to be admitted to the QF major after year 1. Because i understand that QF is a pretty much tough course to get in and most of the slots are taken up by the foreigners. If that is the case, I would not bother taking Applied Maths just so i can focus on something more tangible.

Really appreciate any advice on this. Thanks!

Btw, the QF i'm referring to is the one offered in NUS FoS.

truewt
07-18-2010, 04:51 PM
Hi there

I've been admitted into QF just as of June 2010. And I'm a Singaporean, and I know of singaporean friends who managed to get in as well.

IMO, you need to know what you really want and go for it. With a goal in mind, I don't think anything can stop you.

hohoheha
07-19-2010, 11:50 PM
hey thanks for the encouragement.

but as there is stiff competition for QF, i was just wondering what CAP u got in order to enter QF major?

truewt
07-20-2010, 02:26 PM
i don't think CAP matters, I've got friends with 4.6 and entering. It's actually the grades of the qualifying modules that really matters.

My CAP is 4.88 though.