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lonestarz
04-17-2009, 11:27 AM
Does anyone has any information regarding the scholarships that are available for Post-grad studies that are non research by nature. Of course, it's always beneficial to list all scholarships that are avilable for the benefits of others too. :)

yanshuo
04-17-2009, 12:01 PM
No bond: OCBC, Tan Kah Khee Foundation, university scholarships, and scholarships offered by foreign governments (e.g. France, Australia)

Bond: PSC, SPH, HPB, LTA, Creative Industries, MCYS, ISEAS

These are those you can find by searching the BrightSparks database. There are certainly more out there.

lonestarz
04-17-2009, 01:00 PM
I believe OCBC only offers undergraduate scholarships right? And Tan Kah Kee according to their website offer a fixed amount rather than the tuition fees of your post-grad studies. In other words it's more a supplement than anything, but then again anything is better than nothing:D

twasher
05-01-2009, 04:39 PM
A clarification: in the US 'university scholarships' usually come in the form of teaching assistantships, research assistantships or fellowships. The former two explain themselves --- in return for being financed you have to teach and/or work in a lab. Fellowships pay you just for being a student. I thought it's worth clarifying since as a TA or RA you are more like an employee of the university; in the US context a 'scholarship' usually refers to financial help that's given to you just to study.

Most reputable PhD programs in the US will, upon admitting you, offer full tuition remission, health insurance coverage, and a stipend fully covering your living costs. The money for this generally comes from a combination of TAships, RAships and fellowships.

patryn33
05-22-2009, 06:35 AM
all TA/RA/Fellowships comes with full tuition remission, health insurance coverage. stipend fully covering your living costs is so not true for TA/RA. TA have various level, half time, quarter time etc. Some ppl have to live extremely frugal to survive.
Fellowship on the other hand will cover most of your living expenses.

yanshuo
05-26-2009, 04:02 PM
all TA/RA/Fellowships comes with full tuition remission, health insurance coverage. stipend fully covering your living costs is so not true for TA/RA. TA have various level, half time, quarter time etc. Some ppl have to live extremely frugal to survive.
Fellowship on the other hand will cover most of your living expenses.

Hmm, do you know what is the process / criteria for obtaining a fellowship?

patryn33
05-28-2009, 03:33 AM
Hmm, do you know what is the process / criteria for obtaining a fellowship?

don't know the process.
criteria not sure... the ppl I know of getting a fellowship have excellent GPA close to perfect and GRE scores. some have research experience and has publish/co-author a paper.

twasher
06-01-2009, 11:21 AM
TAships may come at varying levels but most good PhD programs offer full TAships. Furthermore, some TAships actually offer more money than fellowships. (I know someone who had an offer for a mixed TA/fellowship PhD with the TAship at US$27,000/year and the fellowship at US$23,000/year.)

In general (and this is just advice I get from my professors), if a PhD program is unable to offer you full tuition remission and coverage of your living costs, then it's not a good enough program for you to be spending 5-7 years of your prime years in. The good PhD programs compete with each other for students and they cannot get good students if they don't offer the full package. There are some exceptions like the University of California system, which has excellent programs but is particularly short on funds for international students. But in general, if the program is good, it should offer you full funding upon admission.

Further to patryn's last post, it is not necessary to have a 'near perfect' GPA or near perfect GRE scores either. I don't know what his definition of 'near' is but the most important parts of your file are the parts demonstrating your research potential. Someone with a GPA of 3.6 but with an excellent research record will generally be favoured over someone with a 4.0 and no research record. Also, it is very, very rare for undergrads to have published in peer-reviewed journals. The vast majority of people who gain admission have not published. The importance of GREs varies from subject to subject. They are generally more important for the sciences and less important for the humanities. Letters of recommendation are actually much more important than the GREs. A terribly low GRE is a red flag but a mediocre GRE can be made up for by having excellent letters of recommendation.

The chances of getting a fellowship also varies from university to university. State universities generally have fewer fellowships available than private universities. So the same student who gained admission to an excellent public university and an excellent private university might receive a fellowship at the latter but not at the former, for the simple reason that the former might not be able to afford to give out fellowships. I know of many programs where all students in the program get the same deal --- a mixture of TAships and fellowships (e.g. 2 yrs TA, 3 fellow), so there is no hierarchy within the program itself. Whether you get a fellowship is highly dependent on the vagaries of funding at the particular university and department. Even if a program is great at research in its field and hence a top pick for applicants, it might be short of funds by virtue of belonging to a certain public funding system. It might be harder to get a TAship at a top program than to get a fellowship at a lesser program. So the TAship/fellowship hierarchy is not that simple.

patryn33
06-02-2009, 08:41 PM
So kind of U contributing at great details.
I have to agree published research work is more impt than GPA/GRE scores.
I also agree on the fact on recommendations letter > GRE.
fact is how many undergrad do got Solid recommendations that highlight more than handwork/intelligence?

my social circle not that wide, ppl I know who get $30-40K fellowship deals do have "near" perfect scores. Not in the position to see whats in the recommendation, not idea whats goes in there.

U missed 1 pt too, Name of Uni is very impt too. U can find a ivy Arts students with no background in Sci doing a Phd in Math at some decently ranked Uni somehow awarded with TA. They don't know the subject well, but is expected to teach students. And yes, its very complicated thingy with funding.

twasher
06-02-2009, 11:36 PM
"fact is how many undergrad do got Solid recommendations that highlight more than handwork/intelligence?"

If all your letters of recommendation are from professors who know nothing about you other than that you took a class from them and got an A, you are going to have trouble getting into the top schools. At that level of competition you need to have at least one letter describing something about you that is more than that you are intelligent. Your intelligence and diligence can be gleaned from your transcript, so grad schools are looking for something more. Typically your letter writers should have something substantial to say about your ability to work independently, your distinctive thinking style, your creativity, etc. Qualities that aren't evident in your official academic records. Almost every undergrad who is keen on doing a PhD gets heavily involved in research so he/she will easily get to know a few faculty members on a working basis. The other way is to try and learn more from professors teaching your courses outside classroom time. If you pop in their office often and ask good questions, they can get to know you well enough to write an informative letter.

"U can find a ivy Arts students with no background in Sci doing a Phd in Math at some decently ranked Uni somehow awarded with TA."

Unless you have a real example of this, I think this is not true. Even science majors have great difficulties getting into math PhD programs. To be a math PhD student, you are expected to have had the 'core' undergrad background of analysis and algebra at the very least. In most places, once you get that background you practically have a math minor. A math minor coupled with excellent recommendations might get you places but zero math background is a definite no-no. Teaching is actually not as much of an issue as the fact that you will basically be unable to understand anything that's going on in your graduate courses unless you have the requisite undergrad background. Math is probably the hardest field to switch into if you don't have an undergrad major in it.

Also, I don't know if your $30-40k figure is in Sing dollars, but US$30-40k fellowships are very rare. Most university fellowships/TAships/RAships are less than that. NIH and NSF have fellowships that pay >US$30k but foreigners are not eligible for those.

cleanerdung
06-03-2009, 08:54 AM
I also agree on the fact on recommendations letter > GRE. fact is how many undergrad do got Solid recommendations that highlight more than handwork/intelligence?

sometimes, WHO writes your recommendation letter might be just as important as what is written in the letter itself.

twasher
06-04-2009, 09:03 PM
sometimes, WHO writes your recommendation letter might be just as important as what is written in the letter itself.

If the option is between a letter from a famous person who doesn't know you well and a letter from an unknown who knows you very well, always choose the latter. Again, I'm not asserting this without basis --- it's a point that's been emphasised at every grad school advice talk I've been to.