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slayercsa
09-04-2010, 09:02 PM
Any idea what is considered as old for a fresh grad?

25?
26?
27?

Ashearo
09-05-2010, 02:59 AM
Any idea what is considered as old for a fresh grad?

25?
26?
27?

And how is this relevant to any thing?

HappyGoLucky
09-05-2010, 06:14 PM
And how is this relevant to any thing?

well, it will raise questions during interviews. and some management trainee programs and postgrad scholarships have age limits.

I would say if you are >28 and you have no true working experience (at least 1 year full time employment) then it would be rather old for a fresh grad. NS not counted as full time employment unless you are a regular.

slayercsa
09-06-2010, 10:15 PM
wow 28...

is that a rather young age? consider most of people grad at 25 or 26 for guys.


so you only got like 2 years to try what you wan to be...

TheAnonymous
09-06-2010, 10:49 PM
If i successfully enrol to ntu next year, i will be 28 years old fresh grad with only 1 year of work experience :(

LockT31W
09-07-2010, 09:35 AM
wow 28...

is that a rather young age? consider most of people grad at 25 or 26 for guys.


so you only got like 2 years to try what you wan to be...

I don't think there's some universal age limit for trying things.

HappyGoLucky
09-07-2010, 01:19 PM
so you only got like 2 years to try what you wan to be...

what do you mean 'to try what you wan to be'?

if you work for 2 years in a job and decide to change to something completely different, you won't be considered a fresh grad.

slayercsa
09-14-2010, 10:06 PM
maybe if your an engineer, then you decided to change to the finance side...but you got no prior experience...


I calculated I will be graduating from uni at 26 years old, compared to some of my peers( JC route) at 25 years old. Will I be disadvantage?

LockT31W
09-15-2010, 12:54 AM
one year is no big deal. it's really not something you need to worry about.

on the other hand, why switch to finance if you want to go into finance? maybe you should have stuck with engineering. engineers are in great demand in many finance jobs.

HappyGoLucky
09-15-2010, 09:58 AM
maybe if your an engineer, then you decided to change to the finance side...but you got no prior experience...

lets say your grad at 26 and worked a few years as an engineer, and decide to switch to finance. employers won't consider you as a fresh grad even though you have no prior experience. your working experience as an engineer still counts (as long as it isn't something like just a few months...), you basically have to show what sort of transferable skills you have.

and yes, I have seen engine grads working 1-2 years in engineering before making the switch to finance. it really depends on what sort of jobs you are looking for. having the right contacts would definitely help to ease things in. alternatively, some would do a masters to help them in switch industry.

I calculated I will be graduating from uni at 26 years old, compared to some of my peers( JC route) at 25 years old. Will I be disadvantage?

not at all. there are many guys, and even some girls, who graduate at 26 too. some took time off to pursue their interests. some took time off due to medical/personal reasons. some repeated year/s in school. some decided to change course mid-way through.

GSC1989
09-15-2010, 06:56 PM
I calculated I will be graduating from uni at 26 years old, compared to some of my peers( JC route) at 25 years old. Will I be disadvantage?

I think the bigger question is whether you would have been at a bigger disadvantage compared to not having done the course at all. (Not that I am suggesting you are thinking along this route, just pointing out another perspective of looking at the issue) Personally, I don't think the one year difference matters that much.

On the bright side, you have at least one additional year of relevant additional background experience from your polytechnic which will help you appreciate your major in university better :o.

lets say your grad at 26 and worked a few years as an engineer, and decide to switch to finance. employers won't consider you as a fresh grad even though you have no prior experience. your working experience as an engineer still counts (as long as it isn't something like just a few months...), you basically have to show what sort of transferable skills you have.

I do agree with this. There are many engineers who have plied their trade in finance and while not all of them are doing that well, there is still a considerable amount making it due to their mathematical and analytical foundations.

The last part of HappyGoLucky's post is very good advice though :).

slayercsa
09-15-2010, 10:45 PM
I think the bigger question is whether you would have been at a bigger disadvantage compared to not having done the course at all. (Not that I am suggesting you are thinking along this route, just pointing out another perspective of looking at the issue) Personally, I don't think the one year difference matters that much.

On the bright side, you have at least one additional year of relevant additional background experience from your polytechnic which will help you appreciate your major in university better :o.



...

The last part of HappyGoLucky's post is very good advice though :).

PS: Diploma differ from degree..so maybe you are mistaken about the relevant additional background experience.

Ya...I was just citing engineering -> finance as an example, since I can't really think of what I can jump to if I start off from finance.

HappyGoLucky
09-16-2010, 10:21 AM
Ya...I was just citing engineering -> finance as an example, since I can't really think of what I can jump to if I start off from finance.

I've seen people move from finance to communications.

usually they'll make a gradual switch to financial journalism, or doing PR for finance industry... and then make they'll make the complete switch after gaining some experience.

it really depends what sort of jobscope you are looking into in finance. its a rather broad industry.

Groupon
04-02-2011, 08:44 PM
well, it will raise questions during interviews. and some management trainee programs and postgrad scholarships have age limits.


here's an example of a management trainee program with an age cap:

Kraft Food Management Trainee Program is a 24-month program designed to nurture the best talent to grow with our business... What we are looking for: Less than 1 year professional working experience and aged below 27 years

http://sg.jobsdb.com/SG/EN/Search/JobAdSingleDetail?jobsIdList=400003000384318