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kuchimeh
10-09-2010, 08:28 PM
Hello,
I'm a J2 student who have to serve NS after my As this year. I'm considering to apply this year.

Firstly, I would like to ask if the application fee stated by each US uni is cumulative. E.g. if I apply to 5 of them through common app, with each of them requiring an application fee of $50. I would have to pay $250?

Secondly, is it possible to make use of all 3 cycles available to me to apply for a school I want, does it increase my odds. (or I stand no chance once I get rejected in the first year because my profile does not match what they want).

Thirdly, my family is not very wealthy and I'm looking for external funding for my education. If I do not apply for any aid and get admitted, and I accept the placing while continue looking for funding. What if I'm unable to find any funding before getting admitted? What do I tell the university?

Run
10-09-2010, 10:20 PM
Hello,
I'm a J2 student who have to serve NS after my As this year. I'm considering to apply this year.

Firstly, I would like to ask if the application fee stated by each US uni is cumulative. E.g. if I apply to 5 of them through common app, with each of them requiring an application fee of $50. I would have to pay $250?

Secondly, is it possible to make use of all 3 cycles available to me to apply for a school I want, does it increase my odds. (or I stand no chance once I get rejected in the first year because my profile does not match what they want).

Thirdly, my family is not very wealthy and I'm looking for external funding for my education. If I do not apply for any aid and get admitted, and I accept the placing while continue looking for funding. What if I'm unable to find any funding before getting admitted? What do I tell the university?

1. Yes.

2. You could, but generally if you've been rejected once they will reject you again. In your application, they ask if you've previously applied to the school. Unless you've there are any significant changes in your grades or portfolio (e.g. retook 'A' levels, done lots of CIP, internships), it's highly unlikely that they'll give you an offer the second or third time you apply. Even then they might still reject you again. Most of the time, people who use the 3 cycles apply to different schools. Anyway, there are many great schools in the US, probably more than you can apply to even if you use all three cycles :p

3. I guess you could tell the university that of your situation, that you originally planned to get a scholarship to pay for your education, but are unable to attend because you couldn't secure one. If I remember correctly (it's been a while since I applied), they do ask how you are paying for your education in your application. Also, some schools are rather generous with aid, and some give bond-free (!) scholarships to students.

Hope this helps! :)

Haecceity
10-09-2010, 10:54 PM
Just to add:
3. Yes, there is a section where they ask you if you plan to apply for aid or how you're paying for it. If you're planning to apply for aid from the school itself, and mention that in your application, I would suggest you apply for need-blind schools, where your application is not affected by whether you're applying for aid or not.

patryn33
10-10-2010, 11:11 AM
3rd: don't apply to public Uni if U are seeking aid. Chances are U will not find it.
Uni such as Uni of Indiana gives merit award of ~$9K a yr.
LACs such as Berea College are generous with aid.
Cooper Union also pretty generous, every admitted students are not required to pay tuition.
of course top Uni such as MIT/Stanford/Harvard/Cornell etc are extremely generous with aid.

kuchimeh
10-10-2010, 10:22 PM
Thanks for the replies guys.

Actually, I am aware that some schools are generous with their aid. However, most schools are not need-blind to international applicants. With the recent financial crisis, schools' budget for international students is further decreased. If I were to apply for aid during my application process, I have a feeling it would severely decrease my chances by pitting me against top-notch applicants from around the globe.

By the way, how do schools look at prelim results/school results. Or do they just take it as a rough gauge and place more emphasis on your A level results.
I am thinking of applying to Brown but my prelim results is not too spectacular. (A B B D E, with hopes of D and E being moderated by 1 grade upwards)

Should I apply this cycle with my prelim or wait till A levels?

patryn33
10-11-2010, 07:44 AM
ivies its not always about grades.
CCA? teachers recommendation? essay? any outstanding award? athletic represented country?
anyway, have U sat for your SAT w/Writing and 2 SAT Subject Tests?

if u have stellar SAT and SAT 2 score, U can apply with your prelim. else just wait for A levels.

I bet U have seen this info
http://www.brown.edu/Administration/Admission/gettoknowus/factsandfigures.html

Butterbeer
10-11-2010, 07:32 PM
Thanks for the replies guys.

Actually, I am aware that some schools are generous with their aid. However, most schools are not need-blind to international applicants. With the recent financial crisis, schools' budget for international students is further decreased. If I were to apply for aid during my application process, I have a feeling it would severely decrease my chances by pitting me against top-notch applicants from around the globe.


Wow there are some need-blind schools that are well-known to all, rather reliable but not "official" sources have informed me that only harvard, yale, princeton, mit are TRULY TRULY 100% needblind.

By the way, how do schools look at prelim results/school results. Or do they just take it as a rough gauge and place more emphasis on your A level results.
I am thinking of applying to Brown but my prelim results is not too spectacular. (A B B D E, with hopes of D and E being moderated by 1 grade upwards)

How much emphasis placed on prelims depends on the school that you are applying for - how competitive, and how much emphasis they place on academic excellence. For Brown, its getting really competitive (sub-10% admission rate for Class of 2014) so yes i think your prelim grades will disadvantage you.

Should I apply this cycle with my prelim or wait till A levels?


If your A levels turn out much better (i.e. almost all As) then perhaps applying with A Level grades may be a better move. But note, your school may still ask you to submit prelim grades. and there's the fact that even with the good A level grades, there are still so many more significant barriers to clear such as the essay and the recommendations.

kuchimeh
10-11-2010, 11:14 PM
I do have a bit of CCA achivements and extras.
Academic-wise, I have taken a NTU H3 course.
CCA wise, I have 2 CCAs
1. sports-wise, I'm the the school team
Got 2nd placing for team in interschools this year and 1st placing for indviduals
played in a random international competition but failed to win anything..
(got my National Colors though)
2. Exco of a club in school too, help to organise a few events in school.
3. Part of organizing team for 2 service learning projects, 1 overseas, 1 local
4. Volunteer for YOG
5. got about 170 CIP hours if that means anythings...

SAT wise, screwed up my SAT I, waiting to take 2 on 6 NOV, retaking 1 on 4 DEC and hope to submit the new results.

Actually, don't the schools actually consider the fact that our prelim is way harder than A levels? Or do they just look at the grades?

Run
10-12-2010, 12:25 AM
How did you do for your other school exams (promos, common tests)? If you did well for them, you should submit them as well, and prove that your prelim results are anomalies.

Since you can't do anything significant about your prelim results right now, perhaps you should work on those which you can, like your essays, SATs and 'A' Levels. Like others have said, your prelim results aren't the only significant factors in whether you get accepted or not.

Being need-blind is one thing, but whether they give you enough aid is another. But you could always try for it and see how much aid they offer you, if you get in.

:)

kuchimeh
10-12-2010, 06:42 PM
Other grades are around the same...
Now with moderation, prelim grades stand @ A B B C D, with a D for GP..
is a prelim grade like this not good enough? Or should I wait for A level results?

Butterbeer
10-13-2010, 09:50 AM
Other grades are around the same...
Now with moderation, prelim grades stand @ A B B C D, with a D for GP..
is a prelim grade like this not good enough? Or should I wait for A level results?

they may be "acceptable" but they definitely don't make your application look better.

maybe you could share which schs you are interested in applying for? to see if your prelim results will indeed disadvantage you a lot compared to the general calibre of applicants for apply for those particular schools...

Run
10-13-2010, 12:24 PM
Seems like you have a good CCA record. If you really want to apply to Brown, and have time to craft a good essay and get your application stuff in order, try applying ED to Brown, you may stand a better chance. Your results, while they aren't fantastic probably when compared to the rest of the applicant pool, aren't too bad either. Anyway, there are lots of great schools in the US, and even if you don't get admitted to Brown, you can try applying to the rest of the other great schools in the states in the next cycle, when you've gotten your 'A' level results.

:)

kuchimeh
10-14-2010, 05:59 PM
Thanks.. May I know what is the difference between ED and RD? Is there any advantage in ED actually, since you have to make decisions without knowing your results at all

Butterbeer
10-14-2010, 06:35 PM
With regards to protocol, ED = early decision, you can only choose one school to apply ED to, and if you get in, you are committed to go to THAT school, and withdraw/refrain from all other applications to any other schools. deadline usually ard 1 nov, results ard 15 dec.

RD = regular decision, can apply to many schools and get multiple decisions then choose 1. deadline ard 1 jan, results ard 1 apr.

yes, ED can boost your chances in the sense that you are saying that you are committed to attending this school and no others, increasing your impression points. for e.g. for schools like duke and penn the ED and RD admission rates are obviously different.

BUT this may also sometimes be due to the fact that the strongest applicants apply in ED, given that (1) they have their application ready and are confident of their application (2) they are very keen on that school and have made great great efforts to make a stellar application. so, bear in mind that the ED pool, while smaller in quantity, does not pale in terms of quality, as compared to the RD pool.

conclusion: apply ED only if (1) you are very sure you only want to go to that school and that school is (in your opinion) the best choice for you and (2) you are very sure that you can submit a top-notch application that is competitive enough in the ED pool.

Run
10-16-2010, 12:10 PM
Sorry, I typed the previous post in a hurry. I forgot to add that you'd obviously be better off applying ED with your 'A' Level results, if you do better in the 'A' Levels. I said you might want to try ED if you really have to apply this year.

I poked around the Brown admissions page for a bit, but couldn't find any statistics on how many students applied for and were admitted through ED. Without statistics, it's not easy to say whether it'll be easier or harder if you apply ED. Colleges don't base their decisions solely on applicants' academics. True, there are strong applicants applying, but there are also many who don't have extremely outstanding scores (that said, most, if not all, of the students have good scores), hoping to use ED to get an advantage over others. And the really strong applicants might want to try for schools such as Stanford and Yale, which offer restrictive Early Action, or other schools that offer ED.

But yes, like Butterbeer has said, only apply if you are extremely sure you want to attend if you get admitted, and if you can submit a very good application.

Oh, and just to add on to what he said, even if you don't get through with ED, it's possible that you might be "deferred" to RD.

Since you have 3 cycles to apply, why not wait till your 'A' level results are released? You can use your time now to study for your 'A' levels, or take the SATs. I think 2 cycles should be enough, you probably won't want to spend too much money applying to colleges.

:)

kuchimeh
10-17-2010, 08:33 AM
Looked it up on college board, statistics for Brown's ED
* Number of early decision applications received: 2,453
* Number admitted under early decision plan: 548
that's over 20%, low, but higher than RD of about 11%..
maybe I really should be looking at ED next year..
Thanks a lot guys for the advice.