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charleneneo
12-13-2007, 11:01 AM
Hello all,

I am a Sophomore (2nd year) at Harvard, in Cambridge USA, and would love to help those who are interested to apply to schools in the USA.

I have one advice to give to you all: Just apply to any of the schools which interest you, after you learn about the school's culture, curriculum and other various factors. This goes to applying for scholarships--- you lose nothing by trying!

Feel free to reply to the thread and I'll get back to you!

Good luck with all the application processes!

Peisen
01-03-2008, 12:46 AM
Hi Charlene,

I'm currently waiting for my A level results this year. Hm.. perhaps, could i request you to tell me more about your school profiles when you were applying Harvard ? I wish to know more about your CCA achievements, A level results, and external achievements that you feel would have enabled you to outshine the other Harvard applicants.

Pls write as long as possible... i would love to read and find out more.
By the way, I think i've heard about you. You are my senior. Were you from RJC squash? I heard you were the only one who managed to get in Harvard in your year. Very very impressive !!! :):):)

Best regards
Peisen

Michelle
01-23-2008, 12:41 PM
Side topic:

Harvard, along with other Ivys and schools of similar repute only accepts a few students from Singapore each year. Unfortunately, not many people know that... Maybe it's a lifetime of being told we are "world-class", "excellence (sic)" and top this and that. Afraid there will be many disappointed people out there. :)

I brought this up because I had experienced it myself. Coming from a string of "top" schools in Singapore, I had thought any school in the US or UK would love to have me. Hahahaha.... Sadly, that's not the case for US schools (the UK ones all accepted me). Some lost my application, some did not receive it and some that did actually had the cheek to say something akin to "we'll call you..." Hahahaa... But eventually, I did get picked up by one pretty decent school. I was the only Singaporean admitted in that year. It was an MBA program by the way, but I think undergrads prob have the same experience.

What Singaporeans dont realise is how insignificant we are. The attention is on China and India. Sure, Americans have heard of Singapore, along with Michael Fay, chewing gum and the words "clinical", "authoritarian", used quite a bit in descriptions. It was a reality check for me and a humbling experience. But it has also opened up my mind a lot in terms of being more accepting of differences, opinions and respecting those differences/opinions.

Guess it's a matter of big fish in small pond and small fish in big pond. :)

Anyway, yes, no harm trying to apply to good schools! It's a bit like 4D, never buy, won't strike. If buy, at least got chance. :p

LockT31W
03-29-2008, 10:10 PM
wow i think i was one of the people you PMed on CC, David. focus on your A levels and this year! don't get too obsessed. unless you have represented singapore at an international science olympiad, won some international competition or has been truly excellent in every sense of the definition of "well-rounded", harvard is a near-impossibility, as those folks on CC would tell you ;)

LockT31W
03-29-2008, 10:41 PM
wow i think i was one of the people you PMed on CC, David. focus on your A levels and this year! don't get too obsessed. unless you have represented singapore at an international science olympiad, won some international competition or has been truly excellent in every sense of the definition of "well-rounded", harvard is a near-impossibility, as those folks on CC would tell you ;)

and oh David, if you are who i THINK you are, good luck for the ISEF :D you'd have a good shot at Harvard if you win anything at the ISEF!

and what happened to the legendary Sim Jingwei? she didn't get a perfect score this time round. did she falter or something?

LockT31W
03-30-2008, 12:28 AM
nope, i'm from HC, but i do have great sources of intelligence :P haha jk. then i have no doubt that sim jingwei will be a psc scholar or even a president's scholar. people like her make me wanna go back to sec 1 and start over, but i've certainly achieved much more than enough for myself imo.

i have no doubt anyway that you'll have a good chance at either pton stanford or harvard. are you planning on applying to any govt scholarship? if you qualify for OCS next year, I've no doubt that you'll be a serious SAFOS candidate. think Hong Wenxian, He Ruimin, He Ruijie or Amerson Lin, all from your school. they're all exceptional at science, but of course they have adequate achievement in other areas too.

LockT31W
03-30-2008, 12:48 AM
hm well i'm actually in my second year of NS - last year, the scholarships i really wanted didn't accept me, so i'll only go overseas if im able to raise the cash. otherwise, i'll probably be fine staying in singapore, since i've already secured a place in nus law, quite an interesting course and something i could do well in imo.

hm which spf interview are you talking about? the SPF book prize, or the interviews conducted after the MHA programme/SPFOS recruitment outward bound style camp? I think the latter is usually conducted in the June of your J2 year.

LockT31W
03-30-2008, 12:56 AM
yep, got rejected by the PSC, but i probably overestimated my chances for that in retrospect :P they're not gonna interview me again anyway, so no matter. law is another good way to get into politics and public service - another reason for me. :P

well you have to make sure you're really fit to qualify for SAF or SPF scholarships. the Home Affairs Programme I was talking about earlier requires at least a NAPFA bronze if i remember correctly. and personally i would take SPF over SAF any day. it seems like more meaningful work :D

LockT31W
03-30-2008, 01:07 AM
hahah, well i have no idea seriously about the success rates, but doesn't RJC's USapps webbie give a good idea? there's no point in knowing the statistics - it doesn't help your chances. all that you need to keep in mind is that you can't just apply to HYPSM; do apply to backup schools too.

actually i'm just very interested in scholarships and the "future high-flyers" i guess, it's always interesting to see where they end up. i want to be one too, but this will probably end up as some youth invincinbility complex that will fade after i discover more meaning and more important things in life. =X

anyway, if you're interested in SPFOS, do talk to your seniors to find out more about the selection process. what i can tell you is that your performance at the Home Affairs Programme / Camp in June is very important. that's where they identify future scholars.

LockT31W
03-30-2008, 01:23 AM
oops i think this conversation has veered off topic. maybe we can find somewhere else to continue discussiing SPF in one of theo the forums?

haha i do know one or two people from your batch... and anyway i've recently visited the RJC webbie to find out how badly HC has beaten RJC in the A levels this year :P haha and there was a news article about you going to the ISEF also. so i put two and two together.

and well, of course it won't hurt your chances of getting SPFOS if you don't attend that programme. your SPF book prize helps a little. but the June camp is really an early recruitment camp for the SPFOS, and those who attend and impress them WILL get an advantage over you and will be remembered during the actual scholarship selection. SPFOS after all is a uniformed service scholarship, they wanna see how you perform in stressful and physical situations, and earmark people for the different scholarships (a SPFOS, a MHA-level scholarship, or a SPF local scholarship etc) i know for a fact that one of my friends who got "earmarked" for the SPFOS during the camp eventually got it. if you really can't attend the camp, just remember to qualify for and do very well in OCS and the scholarship interview. attend the SPF events and make sure they know you're very interested, but i'm not in the position to confirm that it's enough to make up for not attending the camp.

LockT31W
03-30-2008, 05:10 PM
whoa its okay lah, relax man. RJ's been beating HC for years now - can't you guys just lose for one year and take it easy? ;) i'll start a new thread abt SPFOS somewhere else later btw,

theblahblah
04-06-2008, 02:40 PM
haha where did charleneneo go to? too busy with work in uni? not saying that she didn't have fantastic grades ( i bet she did) but anyone thinks squash gave her an advantage against all the other grade producing machines? there are 3 singaporeans in the harvard squash team. that must say sth right?

charleneneo
04-07-2008, 01:41 AM
Hey guys,

Sorry for not responding earlier. I started this forum after receiving an invitation to help out students who are interested in applying to US universities, with an intention to encourage all students to take the initiative to apply to all universities freely, as many students are often intimidated by the "big name"/ivy league universities.

Indeed, applying to many "famous" universities can be a very tedious and competitive process, but it is by no chance a self-eliminating process. You will not be immediately eliminated from the admissions process for scoring a 790 out of 800 just because of the 10-point difference. Many students that I have come across from several JC talks over the summer have told me that more often than not, they are "afraid" to apply to such schools for the fear of rejection. My take on this is that you should never feel that you are "inadequate", and you should always just take the chance and apply, for you will never know the outcome.

Being in the ivy league for two years now, I know that many admission committee boards look for students who are not only all-rounded, but also top leaders and performers in their various extra-curricular interests. Be it be in music, sports, art, student groups, cultural groups or the performing arts, the list is non-exhaustive. They want to cultivate leaders for the future, so they want to see potential in the people that they admit. They want to see initiative, enthusiasm, determination and much more.

I know many peers at college who did not get full marks for their SATS, but are doing amazingly well at college. They are, however, leaders in their respective ways. A girl from my freshman dormitory is an award-winning short-film maker, someone else is a top performing violinist, my room mate was a cross-country runner-- they are all amazing people. To top it off, many of them also have top-personalities to match up to their capabilities.

There is really no "hard and fast" rule to the type of people who get into top colleges. You just have to try it out and hope for the best. Being equipped with all the help that you can get (admissions process, rules, experience from people who have been there and done that etc), will definitely be beneficial. I know most of the JCs in Singapore will be able to help you through.

My job here is to help you guys know that you are definitely qualified and I would love to help you out in terms of re-emphasizing the fact that you are all well-qualified students who will do well no matter where you end up at. I would like to help out in ways that I can through my experiences with applying for scholarships, grants, and universities.

I am, rather disturbed however, by the environment that this forum has been turning into. You guys should know that when you get out there, you represent your country, not just yourself. People will know that you're from Singapore, but they might not know much about your college. RJC and HC are all top schools, but so are the other JCs in Singapore. You go through the same examinations, and you really should not give off any negative notions of superiority or complacency.

Also, you should all know by now that extra-curriculars are very important. All the students (who are able to) in the USA take up extra-curriculars from a very tender age and they excel at it. Similarly, I picked up squash and played for Singapore, and put my heart and soul in my trainings. I am certain that squash gave me a boost in my applications, but one thing for sure is that I am also very active in my personal community involvement projects, and have also participated in outreach programs. I participated actively in dialogue sessions with ministers, did internships in many community and private corporations during my holidays since I was 15, and those are all stuff beyond my sporting abilities. I am not trying to legitimize my endeavours, but am trying to highlight the fact that one thing will not bring you everywhere.

To theblahblah, if that is what everyone thinks, that is fine by me, because as stated above, I am sure that helped me too, beyond other achievements. But personally attacking me or the other singaporeans who are on the team at Harvard does not serve the purpose of this forum. Being petty about how certain people who get in will not help anyone else in trying to apply to such schools. I am certain that top schools will not admit people who are not adequate in their evaluations.
The other two players on the squash team (Shawn Low and Richard Hill) are all fantastic people. Shawn has been a leader in the Deaf awareness project in Singapore, and is continuing his passion for his project here at Harvard. He is also a leading bio reasearcher at the Bio Labs here on campus. His sporting pursuit is highly commendable. Richard is a fantastic sportsman with a great personality. He is one of the most hardworking people that I have ever met, and that by itself is a credit. Let us all try to create a helpful environment for everyone going through the tedious process of applications, instead of being judgemental.

David, yes I know you through Sue Lin, and I'm sure you remember who she is. We can talk more through facebook if you're still really anxious and nervous! Also, remember Sue is also fantastic at helping out with respect to resources and answers to the questions that you may have. :)

I hope this clears the unhealthy environment that has been clouding the past few threads. Let us set a clear and healthier tone for the better good of helping other students who really need the help.

LockT31W
04-07-2008, 08:35 PM
hey Charlene, what are the future career plans available to us Singaporeans if we graduate from a top Ivy? What have Singaporeans worked as after graduating from say Harvard, for example? What are your own plans, if you don't mind sharing them with us? I've been accepted with full financial aid to an American college, and I'm still not too sure what I can do with my life.

and i don't think theblahblah was being petty or judgmental about anyone - nobody can manage that in one short comment. we tend to mistakenly reduce and package strangers into one dimensional people and somehow diminish their actual achievements, and the only thing theblahblah was guilty of was tactlessness. and if the way I jokingly comapred RJC with HC did irk you, then I apologise for that too.

theblahblah
04-07-2008, 10:35 PM
whoa.. slow down a bit there. firstly, i'll like to apologise if I gave you the wrong message. I never meant to be petty or judgemental. in fact, i think that's a wonderful accomplishment to manage sport and other internships etc.so kudos to you for that. but would it be right to say that being a national squash player would give you an adv over say a netball player? it seems very much to be a supply/demand thing and if harvard is in need of squash players then they would prefer to take them in? i was wondering what other sportplayers in spore have such chances? once again this is out of curiosity and I am not in anyway trying to take anything away from your accomplishments.

sapplicant
02-11-2010, 11:15 PM
Hi,

I would like to ask a question regarding the Harvard interview.

When I submitted my Harvard supplement last year, I chose the option 'No' for the question of 'Have you had or have you scheduled an interview' in the supplement since the college will only inform me of the interview after they review my applications.

I didn't choose the option of 'No-but I plan to do so' as I was unable to provide the interview details (where, when and with whom) as requested for that option.

In this case, can someone please tell me if Harvard will still contact me for an interview even though I mistakeably indicated 'no' for that question in the Harvard supplement?

LockT31W
02-12-2010, 01:15 AM
you might want to just email them to clarify. anyway, for harvard, they don't interview everyone who asks for an interview - you'll get the harvard interview only if you're a likely admit.

Run
02-12-2010, 08:36 AM
you might want to just email them to clarify. anyway, for harvard, they don't interview everyone who asks for an interview - you'll get the harvard interview only if you're a likely admit.

Not everyone who gets interviewed will get admitted though...

koo86
02-12-2010, 01:40 PM
Hi,

I would like to ask a question regarding the Harvard interview.

When I submitted my Harvard supplement last year, I chose the option 'No' for the question of 'Have you had or have you scheduled an interview' in the supplement since the college will only inform me of the interview after they review my applications.

I didn't choose the option of 'No-but I plan to do so' as I was unable to provide the interview details (where, when and with whom) as requested for that option.

In this case, can someone please tell me if Harvard will still contact me for an interview even though I mistakeably indicated 'no' for that question in the Harvard supplement?

Most US colleges have some sort of interview session, its just a way of getting to know the candidates better before making the informed session.

chihiro
12-24-2010, 07:24 PM
Hey guys,

Also, you should all know by now that extra-curriculars are very important. All the students (who are able to) in the USA take up extra-curriculars from a very tender age and they excel at it. Similarly, I picked up squash and played for Singapore, and put my heart and soul in my trainings. I am certain that squash gave me a boost in my applications, but one thing for sure is that I am also very active in my personal community involvement projects, and have also participated in outreach programs. I participated actively in dialogue sessions with ministers, did internships in many community and private corporations during my holidays since I was 15, and those are all stuff beyond my sporting abilities.

hi charmaine! just asking, how did you find opportunities to do internships, especially from secondary school days? im interested but i don't know where i can start.. thanks :)

tajeo11
01-25-2011, 08:16 PM
Also, you should all know by now that extra-curriculars are very important. All the students (who are able to) in the USA take up extra-curriculars from a very tender age and they excel at it. Similarly, I picked up squash and played for Singapore, and put my heart and soul in my trainings. I am certain that squash gave me a boost in my applications, but one thing for sure is that I am also very active in my personal community involvement projects, and have also participated in outreach programs. I participated actively in dialogue sessions with ministers, did internships in many community and private corporations during my holidays since I was 15, and those are all stuff beyond my sporting abilities. I am not trying to legitimize my endeavours, but am trying to highlight the fact that one thing will not bring you everywhere.

Hi,

I realise I'm quite late but I do hope that you or someone else capable of helping me gets to see this.

I am currently waiting to get posted to a JC (tomorrow) and I don't really have a very exceptional extra-curricular record, so far. My question is: will I still have a chance if I start in JC1 and work hard at it? Also, what type of ECAs would you recommend I take part in? What if I'm not particularly sporty, and my area of interest is say... Programming. Would I be able to stand a fair chance if that is the situation I'm in?

Thanks.

Haecceity
01-25-2011, 10:05 PM
I think you would still have a chance if you work hard in JC. Admittedly, you might have to work extra-hard.

I'm not sure what Harvard (or other American universities) look for, but I'm guessing the usual: leadership in CCA, competitions... (especially if you're interested in programming, I think there are a handful of programming competitions) If I'm not wrong, you can aim for the olympiads, if you're doing a science stream.

It depends on what CCAs your JC offers. Try to pick one that you enjoy and think you can excel in! I don't think there's a requirement that you do sports as an ECA. :p

Run
01-26-2011, 04:04 AM
Yes, Haecceity's right. Pick one you're passionate about. Doing well in one CCA is better than joining many CCAs just for the sake of having stuff to write on your application.

Also, in my opinion, the college also looks for people with high test scores, who are passionate about what they do and have an ambition, and have good writing skills (and write "unconventional" common app essays). The latter two will be reflected in your common app essay, so learning to write well would definitely help to improve your chances of getting in.

:)

tajeo11
01-26-2011, 07:32 PM
Thanks for the response.

If I'm not wrong, you can aim for the olympiads, if you're doing a science stream.

Yes, I'll look into that. Thanks for reminding me.


Also, in my opinion, the college also looks for people with high test scores, who are passionate about what they do and have an ambition, and have good writing skills (and write "unconventional" common app essays). The latter two will be reflected in your common app essay, so learning to write well would definitely help to improve your chances of getting in.

:)

Thanks, duly noted.


(:o So much thanking. I mean it each time, though. I'm very much in the dark and your replies have been quite helpful.)

LockT31W
01-27-2011, 03:06 PM
International olympiad participants have the best chances of getting into Harvard or any of the HYPSM. Just go for the olympiad.

sohappyicoulddie
01-28-2011, 09:33 AM
International olympiad participants have the best chances of getting into Harvard or any of the HYPSM. Just go for the olympiad.Winners.




10char

LockT31W
01-28-2011, 01:25 PM
Winners.




10char

There's a reason why I chose the word participant. Being chosen to represent your country in an international olympiad is more than good enough.

sohappyicoulddie
01-29-2011, 12:37 PM
There's a reason why I chose the word participant. Being chosen to represent your country in an international olympiad is more than good enough.

I'd doubt so. Do all of the few selected in the international olympiads get into Harvard? That would be a lot of people considering there are a couple of olympiads already in the first place.

Butterbeer
01-29-2011, 01:08 PM
sohappyicouldcuddle,

1. almost 100% of those in singapore who are selected for the international olympiads (i'm looking at phy, chem, bio, math here) do get honourable mention and above. In fact, most do get silver and above. so i'm not sure who, among the participants, would you consider a "non-winner".

2. LockT31W was saying that international olympiad participants have the best chances of getting into Harvard. Being able to participate at the international level is a significant [I]advantage[I] in the applicant pool, not an entry ticket. So trying to use the numbers argument is missing the point. This is even more so, given that many other components such as teacher recs and essays come into the picture.

3. Also, NOT all the international olympiad winners get to HYPSM because

a. some choose Cambridge and Oxford
b. some choose NUS Medicine
c. some have not applied (i.e. in NS now)

This is based on my anecdotal experience here, as i know a few of the people involved.

sohappyicoulddie
01-29-2011, 08:51 PM
sohappyicouldcuddle,

1. almost 100% of those in singapore who are selected for the international olympiads (i'm looking at phy, chem, bio, math here) do get honourable mention and above. In fact, most do get silver and above. so i'm not sure who, among the participants, would you consider a "non-winner".

2. LockT31W was saying that international olympiad participants have the best chances of getting into Harvard. Being able to participate at the international level is a significant [I]advantage[I] in the applicant pool, not an entry ticket. So trying to use the numbers argument is missing the point. This is even more so, given that many other components such as teacher recs and essays come into the picture.

3. Also, NOT all the international olympiad winners get to HYPSM because

a. some choose Cambridge and Oxford
b. some choose NUS Medicine
c. some have not applied (i.e. in NS now)

This is based on my anecdotal experience here, as i know a few of the people involved.
1. Doesn't change the fact that the higher the honour received the greater the chances.

2. Well if you really want to argue about this, then Gold Medallists obviously have a higher chance of entry, than someone with an Honorable Mention.

Ashearo
01-30-2011, 01:08 AM
1. Doesn't change the fact that the higher the honour received the greater the chances.

2. Well if you really want to argue about this, then Gold Medallists obviously have a higher chance of entry, than someone with an Honorable Mention.

Are you really going to continue arguing over this? And to what end? These 'chances' cannot even be quantified.

Every idiot will know the higher the honour, the greater the chances.

If you are trying to pick on pointers given here and try to start a fight, bring it to PM. No one needs to read this.

sohappyicoulddie
01-30-2011, 01:18 AM
Are you really going to continue arguing over this? And to what end? These 'chances' cannot even be quantified.

Every idiot will know the higher the honour, the greater the chances.

If you are trying to pick on pointers given here and try to start a fight, bring it to PM. No one needs to read this.

You seem to be the only one getting worked up here and by doing so you contributed nothing. I think I should end it here, but threadstarter do get at least a bronze at an international olympiad to improve your odds substantially. Peace

Ashearo
01-30-2011, 01:21 AM
You seem to be the only one getting worked up here and by doing so you contributed nothing. I think I should end it here, but threadstarter do get at least a bronze at an international olympiad to improve your odds substantially. Peace

My job here is to make sure people contribute something useful, or nothing at all. Please don't try to tell me what I should do.

LockT31W
01-30-2011, 03:31 AM
I won't try to argue anything here, but from what I've seen and the people I know, generally international olympiad participation should put you in good stead. What medal you get at the olympiad doesn't matter as much as what else you have on your CV and the rest of your application. I know of gold medallists getting rejected by HYPSM and other medallists being accepted in the same year. So my feeling is that if you're going to pursue this track, then the colour of your medal, or whether you get one at all, doesn't matter as much as the rest of your application once you've had the honour of representing your country. Of course, we can only guess at what the admission office is thinking.

But make no mistake, to be selected for I_O is no mean feat. It means at least a gold medal at the local olympiad, plus months of tough training and selection. For physics you probably need "just" a silver medal, because the gold medallists at Singapore olympiads are usually PRC scholars who are not eligible to represent Singapore :P

Just go with your strength. Personally I find that physics and maths olympiads prepare you best for high-level undergraduate work because of their mathematical nature. Computer science, mathematics, physics, economics, engineering, etc are usually simple stuff to those medallists.

LockT31W
01-30-2011, 03:42 AM
sohappyicouldcuddle,

3. Also, NOT all the international olympiad winners get to HYPSM because

a. some choose Cambridge and Oxford
b. some choose NUS Medicine
c. some have not applied (i.e. in NS now)

This is based on my anecdotal experience here, as i know a few of the people involved.

Spot on. Know what you want. HYPSM isn't everyone's cup of tea. I know of one physics medallist who rejected HYPSM because he didn't want to deal with the liberal arts requirements, he just wanted to study physics and do research. So he went Cambridge instead and is blowing everyone else away. On the other hand, if you are interested in i-banking/consulting/civil service/MNCs etc, nothing looks better on your CV than HYPSM. And obviously there's no big reason to go overseas if you want to do medicine or law.

Dreambig22
06-07-2011, 07:23 PM
Hi everyone,

May i ask what is the difference between Harvard College and Harvard University?:)

boucy
06-07-2011, 09:11 PM
As i am not a Harvard student i am not to sure , from what i know Harvard college is the undergrad division

eho
06-07-2011, 10:52 PM
Hi everyone,

May i ask what is the difference between Harvard College and Harvard University?:)

Harvard College is the undergraduate college of Harvard University (includes everything). In short, Harvard College is part of Harvard University.

Dreambig22
06-08-2011, 12:38 AM
Thanks for the reply:) I also wanna ask if we can choose not to take the liberal arts program in Harvard college? And choose our courses as we like:)

How many courses must we take?

Appreciate your replies <3

Thanks a lot!

myguy
06-08-2011, 07:27 AM
No, Harvard College is a liberal arts college (LAC) and you must take the Core Curriculum, which includes things like Foreign Cultures, Moral Reasoning, Quantitative Reasoning, History etc. Details are here

http://isites.harvard.edu/icb/icb.do?keyword=core

Pretty much all of the top LACs have a core curriculum although some are less strict than others and rely on a faculty advisor (who will probably direct you through some core curriculum anyway).

The idea of the US liberal arts curriculum is to educate students in a broad manner, whereas the British system tends to train students in something specific

You can also attend Harvard University as a graduate student and do something specific. Its generally easier to get into Harvard's graduate schools than Harvard College.

Dreambig22
06-09-2011, 10:51 PM
Hi,

Thank you so much for all your reply. It's really helpful to me :)

Sorry for being so inquisitive because harvard's been a dream to me :) haha.

Anyway, if i want to study something more specific, maybe just a subject, i should apply for harvard university right?

How many course we suppose to take then? :)

Thanks a lot everyone!

myguy
06-10-2011, 11:17 AM
Hi,
Anyway, if i want to study something more specific, maybe just a subject, i should apply for harvard university right?

How many course we suppose to take then? :)

Thanks a lot everyone!

If you don't want to go to Harvard College for a liberal arts education, then you will be a graduate student at Harvard University i.e., you will need a bachelors degree like B.Sc. or B.A. from some other institution in order to apply to Harvard University graduate schools. The Harvard University graduate schools offer Masters and PhD degrees. You can get a bachelors degree by spending 3 years in a Singapore or UK university or about 4 years in a US college or university before you apply to Harvard University graduate schools.

Harvard Law School, Harvard Business School and Harvard Medical school all require you to get a bachelors degree first.

eho
06-11-2011, 12:07 AM
Hi,

Thank you so much for all your reply. It's really helpful to me :)

Sorry for being so inquisitive because harvard's been a dream to me :) haha.

Anyway, if i want to study something more specific, maybe just a subject, i should apply for harvard university right?

How many course we suppose to take then? :)

Thanks a lot everyone!

Adding on, in fact if you want to study specific stuff, you shouldn't be applying to the US for undergraduate education. You should apply to the UK or Singapore. US offers 4 year liberal arts curriculum at the undergraduate level.

Dreambig22
06-11-2011, 11:04 PM
Harvard Law School, Harvard Business School and Harvard Medical school all require you to get a bachelors degree first.

Then what about Harvard School of Arts and Science?

Thanks!^^

myguy
06-12-2011, 12:10 AM
Then what about Harvard School of Arts and Science?

Thanks!^^

That's Harvard College.

Harvard's faculty of arts and science consists of Harvard College and the Graduate School of Arts and Science.

tajeo11
06-12-2011, 05:58 PM
Adding on, in fact if you want to study specific stuff, you shouldn't be applying to the US for undergraduate education. You should apply to the UK or Singapore. US offers 4 year liberal arts curriculum at the undergraduate level.

Does this statement hold true for colleges such as MIT and Caltech as well?

mengshuen
06-12-2011, 08:41 PM
Does this statement hold true for colleges such as MIT and Caltech as well?
Both MIT and Caltech will require you to take a certain number of liberal arts courses. For MIT, you'd need 8 classes of humanities/arts/social science (that's 1 class per sem) and for Caltech, you'd need 12 classes (1 class per quarter).

It is my opinion that being exposed to a limited offering of liberal arts courses is useful, as it broadens your thinking. Of course, you'd be getting a first-rate technical education in either MIT or Caltech and there are definitely no worries about learning less stuff compared to your peers at Cambridge or Imperial.

However, if you don't like the humanities or arts, it will be more efficient if you just complete a degree in three years through the UK system.

eho
06-12-2011, 10:20 PM
Does this statement hold true for colleges such as MIT and Caltech as well?

mengshuen has answered it well :)

mengshuen
06-12-2011, 11:31 PM
mengshuen has answered it well :)
thank you!

tajeo11
06-13-2011, 06:24 AM
Both MIT and Caltech will require you to take a certain number of liberal arts courses. For MIT, you'd need 8 classes of humanities/arts/social science (that's 1 class per sem) and for Caltech, you'd need 12 classes (1 class per quarter).

It is my opinion that being exposed to a limited offering of liberal arts courses is useful, as it broadens your thinking. Of course, you'd be getting a first-rate technical education in either MIT or Caltech and there are definitely no worries about learning less stuff compared to your peers at Cambridge or Imperial.

However, if you don't like the humanities or arts, it will be more efficient if you just complete a degree in three years through the UK system.

I see, thank you very much.