BrightSparks Forum

Go Back   BrightSparks Singapore Scholarship & Higher Education Forum > University > Overseas > USA
Click Here if you forgot your password.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-22-2008, 12:40 PM   #1
LockT31W
Moderator
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 813
LockT31W has a neutral reputation
Default liberal arts colleges and singaporean employers =/

is it true that the typical singaporean employer thinks poorly of liberal arts degrees, and that many of them have never even heard of the likes of Amherst, Williams and Swathmore? I think LACs offer great undergraduate education, but i'm just worried about whether or not i can find a job when i return. LACs are being truly shortchanged here - they're way better than any singaporean university in terms of the educational experience, but singaporeans know only brand name.
LockT31W is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2008, 09:44 PM   #2
dershing
BrightSparks Expert
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 138
dershing has a neutral reputation
Default

agree that lac are slightly less well known here. But it also depends on the type of employers you are going for. If SME's, firms used to hiring local then they will not know. But if you are applying for global firms, govt positions I believe many know. We do screening for mgmt trainees for many top MNCs and 1 stat board, we do include in top LAC in our list of good universities. So not to worry too much about this.
dershing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2008, 01:30 AM   #3
orthoptics
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 50
orthoptics has a neutral reputation
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dershing View Post
We do screening for mgmt trainees for many top MNCs and 1 stat board, we do include in top LAC in our list of good universities. So not to worry too much about this.
Possible to disclose exactly how many top LACs are there on the list? Just out of curiosity.
orthoptics is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2008, 01:08 PM   #4
Michelle
BrightSparks Expert
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Singapore
Posts: 34
Michelle has a neutral reputation
Default

Hi ortho: dershing is on vacation so i'd thought i reply to your question. Can't quite say which LAC on on our list but you can get a very good hint from this list.. http://colleges.usnews.rankingsandre...rtco_brief.php

Bottomline, we do recognise the value of an education in good LACs. But unfortunately, many SMEs simply don't know any better. For that matter, many larger campanies may not be that far off from the SMEs either. Sometimes it can really come down to the individual recruiter's knowledge base.
Michelle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-23-2008, 07:26 AM   #5
orthoptics
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 50
orthoptics has a neutral reputation
Default

Oh I was just wondering how far down on that list would it be safe to go?
Mount Holyoke? Barnard?
orthoptics is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2008, 03:35 PM   #6
Michelle
BrightSparks Expert
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Singapore
Posts: 34
Michelle has a neutral reputation
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by orthoptics View Post
Oh I was just wondering how far down on that list would it be safe to go?
Mount Holyoke? Barnard?
You do know that there is no definite answer to your question right? No recruiter will be able to tell you they strictly only look at resumes from a certain list of schools or rankings. It's the overall package you offer, some shortcomings can be mitigated by certain strengths, etc.

Here is my personal advice given that I am a pragmatic person. Go to the best school you can, given your financial and academic standing. And as a rule of thumb, a top 20 school is considered most desirable - you just ask this question to yourself, would you be impressed with a school that is ranked 45th? or 35th? How about #25? Yes? Most people will draw the line at 20+ placings. So a recruiter is no different. Rarely will you have a recruiter that is super strict about the schools they hire from. At the end, they are hiring the person...
Michelle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2008, 12:52 PM   #7
orthoptics
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 50
orthoptics has a neutral reputation
Default

Taken from a MOE report:
http://www.moe.gov.sg/media/press/fi...ec-summary.pdf

Features of Liberal Arts Colleges

Focus on undergraduate teaching
14. Liberal arts colleges (LACs) do not offer graduate programmes. Faculty and
resources are focused on undergraduate teaching and learning. This focus provides
students with many opportunities not available to undergraduates in a larger
comprehensive university. For example, undergraduate students in an LAC have the
opportunity to participate in high-level research that would only be available to
postgraduate students in a comprehensive university.

Developing critical thinking and love for learning
15. Liberal arts college students acquire a good foundation in Natural Sciences,
Mathematics, Humanities and Social Sciences through a broad-based education.
They are encouraged to think critically and to synthesise knowledge. This is further
reinforced through the low student-to-faculty ratio. The close interaction between
students and their professors, on- and off-campus and within a small college
environment, instils in students a love for learning and knowledge.

16. Students are also given time and space to decide on their area of
specialisation. They are often able to design their own courses if these are lacking in
the LAC’s offerings. With this nurturing and grounding, a high proportion of LAC
graduates proceed to top graduate schools to pursue postgraduate degrees, e.g. in
medicine and law.

Networks and collaborations
17. Due to their small enrolments, LACs collaborate with other institutions to
share physical as well as academic resources. Potential partners include other
LACs as well as larger universities. One example of such a network of partners is
the Claremont Consortium, of which Pomona College, Harvey Mudd College and
Claremont McKenna College are members. Each member in the Consortium has its
own Board, management and finances, and over time would develop its own unique
character and strengths. For example, Harvey Mudd College specialises in science
and engineering, Pomona College focuses more on broad-based education, while
Claremont McKenna College focuses on business and management courses. The
close proximity of the member institutions enables cross-registration of courses by
students across the member institutions. This arrangement also allows students to
experience learning in their own small college setting, while living amongst a larger
community of students. The extent of collaboration across different Consortiums
varies. For example, the member institutions of the Five College Consortium (of
which Amherst College is a member) mainly share library resources.

18. LACs also forge joint degree programmes with larger universities. For
example, Williams College offers joint degree programmes with Columbia University,
offering students the option to graduate within five years with two bachelor degrees –
one in liberal arts and one in another discipline, such as engineering.

...

Value Proposition of Introducing Liberal Arts Education in Singapore
7. Many Singaporeans misunderstand the concept of a liberal arts college (LAC).
Often, they mistake an LAC to be an institution that offers only the Humanities, or
even Fine and Performing Art degrees only.
A few individuals who have studied in
US LACs have attempted to clarify this misunderstanding on online forums. They
believe that there is value in introducing a broad-based model of education that
offers a wide range of disciplines from the Sciences to the Arts, and “education for
education’s sake”. However, these individuals also acknowledged that increasing
the mindshare of liberal arts education among Singaporeans would be a major
challenge

Last edited by orthoptics; 09-15-2008 at 12:55 PM.
orthoptics is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2008, 02:14 AM   #8
LockT31W
Moderator
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 813
LockT31W has a neutral reputation
Default

hey thanks for posting it, it's pretty interesting. i'm afraid, though, that even if LACs are eventually accepted and appreciated by Singaporeans, they will continue to go by rankings. many great and "different" schools aren't favoured by such rankings.

for some unknown but "life-changing" LACs, check this out:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colleges_That_Change_Lives
LockT31W is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2009, 12:33 AM   #9
vitalism
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 75
vitalism has a neutral reputation
Send a message via MSN to vitalism
Default

I agree that liberal arts colleges (LAC) are definitely not very well known to many Singaporean employers, and for that matter to most other employers around the world ><

But as the teaching pedagogy evolves in Singapore to become one that is less based on rote-learning and more focused on skills and knowledge synthesis, I think more and more people are appreciating the merits of a LAC education. In fact, as far as I know, there are now more scholars heading for LACs.

For your information, our Senior Minister Goh Chok Tong studied at Williams College, one of the top LACs. Wang Lee Hom also studied there
vitalism is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2009, 12:34 AM   #10
LockT31W
Moderator
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 813
LockT31W has a neutral reputation
Default

GCT was a scholar though. He went there for postgrad
LockT31W is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +8. The time now is 02:26 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.