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Old 05-04-2009, 11:44 AM   #31
SMUgger
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Originally Posted by spencer View Post
Don't be shortsighted - study something that will give you a long term competitive advantage. Science students can do libberal arts subjects whereas the reverse is not possible.
typical singaporean aversion to the whole liberal arts concept
no point studying science just to get a "competitive advantage".
you won't have any "competitive advantage" if you have no interest in it.
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Old 05-22-2009, 02:14 AM   #32
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typical singaporean aversion to the whole liberal arts concept
no point studying science just to get a "competitive advantage".
you won't have any "competitive advantage" if you have no interest in it.
Your def of liberal arts is wrong. LA means learning for the sake of learning, rather than for employment purposes. Engineering, accounting and etc are all more geared for employment, whereas subjects like Mathematics, history and so on are learning for the sake of learning.

A friend of mine comes from Harvey Mudd (CA), which describes itself as "A private liberal-arts college focusing on mathematics, the physical and biological sciences, "

Learning Latin or literature won't help you. Waste of time, waste of tax player money. However, a combination of high quality humanities courses, like politics, economics and history (and language), is very very good, esp. for government posts, foreign office, etc.
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Old 05-23-2009, 01:34 PM   #33
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What happen to the post? Market downturn now no one talking about the salary? I am quite curious! So what salary pays the best now in this market recession?

Regards about competitive edge, I heard from my friend who is a manager in one of the fund houses, telling me that as long you are smart, you are hired! He hired someone who graduate first class in Chinese Studies. (Maybe he make a mistake)

Cheers,
Michael Sim
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Old 05-23-2009, 02:00 PM   #34
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Learning Latin or literature won't help you. Waste of time, waste of tax player money.
Philistine!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philistinism

there is more to life than earning money, y'know?

Last edited by cleanerdung; 05-23-2009 at 02:13 PM.
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Old 05-23-2009, 06:29 PM   #35
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Philistine!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philistinism

there is more to life than earning money, y'know?
I would like to agree with you.

But, the reality is such that for many people, working hard to provide food on the table for the familiy and the roof over the head is something we spend more than half our lives doing.

Furthermore, with the economic crisis, I personally know of families whereby the sole breadwinner has lost the job and/or had to take a huge pay-cut.

In times like these, I seriously don't think Latin comes into the picture.
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Old 05-24-2009, 09:54 PM   #36
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Originally Posted by ifione View Post
What happen to the post? Market downturn now no one talking about the salary? I am quite curious! So what salary pays the best now in this market recession?

Regards about competitive edge, I heard from my friend who is a manager in one of the fund houses, telling me that as long you are smart, you are hired! He hired someone who graduate first class in Chinese Studies. (Maybe he make a mistake)

Cheers,
Michael Sim
I'd think people like these have no problems of getting into the sell-side but not that buyside. There is a certain way in which you have to think to succeed at the buyside.
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Old 05-25-2009, 11:17 AM   #37
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Originally Posted by not bright enough View Post
But, the reality is such that for many people, working hard to provide food on the table for the familiy and the roof over the head is something we spend more than half our lives doing.
Careers for latin graduates:

http://www.classics.ox.ac.uk/admissi...ers/index.html
http://www.classics.ox.ac.uk/admissi...ofiles/tom.asp

Okay... I don't buy all of it but I'm just using it as an example.

I just feel that people should think long term when choosing their undegrad courses.

I've seen too many people who chose engineering at NTU thinking that it is a professional degree and it would be useful. They end up flunking exams, repeating modules and taking up to 6 years to complete the degree. And after they graduate, they don't even become engineers... Why do that to yourself?

And then I've seen others in accountancy who choose the course because it promises a stable and decent income. And then after 2 or 3 years of working, they realise that it doesn't suit their personality and they quit their jobs and try to enter other industries. And then they lament about how difficult it is to switch to something else.

What I'm talking about here is finding a balance between practicality and being able to sustain your interest. Yes, earning money is important but please find a job that allows you to earn money for the long term, not just for the few years before you realise the money just isn't enough to drag yourself out of bed to work any more.
Interest helps to sustain you through a career. Different people are motivated by different things. Some can stay on a job just for the money alone, others can't. Question yourself about where you fit into the picture.
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Old 05-25-2009, 10:45 PM   #38
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Originally Posted by cleanerdung View Post
Careers for latin graduates:

http://www.classics.ox.ac.uk/admissi...ers/index.html
http://www.classics.ox.ac.uk/admissi...ofiles/tom.asp

Okay... I don't buy all of it but I'm just using it as an example.

I just feel that people should think long term when choosing their undegrad courses.

I've seen too many people who chose engineering at NTU thinking that it is a professional degree and it would be useful. They end up flunking exams, repeating modules and taking up to 6 years to complete the degree. And after they graduate, they don't even become engineers... Why do that to yourself?

And then I've seen others in accountancy who choose the course because it promises a stable and decent income. And then after 2 or 3 years of working, they realise that it doesn't suit their personality and they quit their jobs and try to enter other industries. And then they lament about how difficult it is to switch to something else.

What I'm talking about here is finding a balance between practicality and being able to sustain your interest. Yes, earning money is important but please find a job that allows you to earn money for the long term, not just for the few years before you realise the money just isn't enough to drag yourself out of bed to work any more.
Interest helps to sustain you through a career. Different people are motivated by different things. Some can stay on a job just for the money alone, others can't. Question yourself about where you fit into the picture.
Those guys are from Oxford, the best university (after Cam) in the entire EMEA region. They won't have problem getting to banks, foreign office etc and may even get headhunted for MI5/MI6.
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Old 05-29-2009, 10:53 AM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cleanerdung View Post
What I'm talking about here is finding a balance between practicality and being able to sustain your interest. Yes, earning money is important but please find a job that allows you to earn money for the long term, not just for the few years before you realise the money just isn't enough to drag yourself out of bed to work any more.
Interest helps to sustain you through a career. Different people are motivated by different things. Some can stay on a job just for the money alone, others can't. Question yourself about where you fit into the picture.
I cant agree further. I flunk my paper in uni in my second year in engineering cause I am not quite interested in those modules I study (To be honest, I was having some complicated relationship adding to the strain I have) Surprisingly I aced my cross-faculty module in political science because I like the module I study and I love the tutorials which evoked discussion of current affairs. Nonetheless, I have move on from my engineering job and now working in finance institution which maybe not really a good place to work now, but I like what I am doing so I am staying on. We should not stop searching for our happiness.

__________________________________________________ ______________
Life is not about whether you start well, but whether you end well eventually.
Regards,
Michael
http://fione.wordpress.com
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Old 09-06-2009, 07:13 PM   #40
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Originally Posted by dershing View Post
hey, here is what i know based on my friends and observations.

PSC Scholar:
$3000 for good honours thereabouts.

Investment Banker (entry-level analyst):
$5K or more per month (friend)

Management Consultant (entry-level):
$5K or more per month (friend of mine)

Lawyer (entry-level):
$4K - $4500 for entry level (from some newspaper article)

Chemical Engineer:
$2500-3500 (uni salary survey)

Teacher
$2,647 to $2,822 (moe web site)
The label PSC scholar is too wide to be used in this context of "pay for ....". Its like saying there is a uniform pay for all "bankers" - which really means anyone working in a bank.

The entry level pay of PSC scholars differs by as much as 50%, depending on which agency he is attached to and what PSC scholar he is - because different ones do different work. OMS scholars generally are paid the same, but different pay from uniformed PSC scholars.

An OMS scholar's entry level salary is now about $75K a year. Uniformed PSC scholars (SAFOS/SPFOS) are paid a lot more than non-uniformed PSC scholars all the way, up to 50%. SAFOS are paid more than SPFOS.

A more realistic entry level lawyer's pay in Singapore is $3.5K. Ask your friends hired by Drew & Napier, Khattar, this is how much they pay to the average freshie. Only the top few percent of the cohort, about a few people, manage to say they got $4K. I am quite sure your newspaper article said that was the highest pay, not the mean pay. Or they quoted one dude who got that figure. Go read it again.

Last edited by brightspark; 09-06-2009 at 07:51 PM.
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