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Old 02-27-2009, 10:06 PM   #11
cosycatus
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So beside manufacturing engineer, the other type is what i called design engineering.

So what do they do? I studied chemical engineering to train to be one...unfortunately, along the way, got hired into a manufacturing plant.
Their job is quite hardcore. They design chemical process

For example, ever wonder how u get say helium to fill ur ballons so they float?
Well, it's actually obtained from Air. And how do you extract it from air??

The simple idea is that if you compress air enough, it liquifies. From the liquified state, as u apply a bit of heat, the one molecule with the lowest boiling point starts to boil ( typically, i think that's N2...), so imagine a distillation column ( go google to read up) with N2 comming out at the bottom as N2 gas, followed higher up by the next type of gas with the next higher point ( O2 for example ) , so in a way, as u boil the liquifed air up the distillation column, the components comes out at different locations due to different boiling point and u collect them at the different locations....and there u have ur first lesson in chemical engineering..

Now, that's the idea. So when u go to buil this column, how do u build it? How tall? how fat? where is the location to draw off the different material. So as process designers, you "size" the column, specifying the different characteristic that let u get the molecule you want...
It's a lot of maths where u try to do mass and energy balance to get what you want. We study the general idea behind what is required , but typically use complicated software to compute for us.. Imagine back in the seventies when there are no computers and they actually do it by hand...

Of course, that's the simple example. Real world process are more complicated and consist of many reactors, distillation column heat exchangers. It can take more than a million man hours to design a simple 10 million dollar plant and as a design engineer, you are at the core of this fantastic process to conceptualise the plant, design it, and as you progress along, ACTUALLY supervise the construction...It's damn romantic.

And singapore has many design and construction firms. FYI, for example, when a oil company want to build a refinery, they do not actually built it themselves. They tend to award building contracts to these design and construction firms which have experience/specialised teams to do it. If the refinery want to add some extra processing capacity, they will contract out the work too.
Ha, the best part of being a design engineer is that you are working in an office environment, most of these office are located in Tanjong Pagar.You have chance to work overseas quite frequently. ( site visit etc)
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Old 02-27-2009, 10:11 PM   #12
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Thx man! For spending time to educate me this noob..



Hmm, so does it mean that NTU provides a better foundation for Chemical Engineers? But NUS is more internationally recognize, isn't it? It got a much higher World ranking than NTU..
are u more concern about the reputation of the school or wat you study/will be working as?
the best chemical engineering school is MIT if u really need to get into what you think is a good school. NUS is not even heard of in some parts of US...so is there a diff btwn NUS and NTU to someone who has heard of neither??

( and yeah...locally, NUS/NTU has a tie up with MIT where u can go on to do a master in chem eng awarded by MIT..full scholarship, 9 months year study/work there, 9 months study/work in Singapore..About 10 pple get it each year. But end of the day, MIT no MIT, it don't make a diff in the private sector in singapore.
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Old 03-01-2009, 05:45 PM   #13
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i totally agree that the chem. eng. subject content taught in uni are rather useless...

all the complicated reaction mechanisms , partial differentiation ... got no use in industry (unless u gg research)

even the more relevant subjects lik unit ops and process control focussed too much on the mathematical parts....

do u really think we need to draw lines and diagrams for separation processes and do laplace tranforms for process control?

nowadays everyone use computer systems...and simulators
i suggest the uni to focus more on these and of cos the excel.. haha

well chemical engineers can be employed in oil,petrochem,chem,pharma,biopharma,semiconductor industries

i still forsee middle to long -term future demand for chem eng. even in the energy and petrochem sector.
solar,geothermal sectors r still not very well-developed and not economically viable. however traditional crude might give way gradually to natural gas (rather abundant) and biofuels

personally, i feel that design engineers need to be more technically inclined than manufacturing engineers....the former need to understand the processes and specs fully to design a feasible reactor/column while the latter usually have the SOP ( standard operating procedures)to follow ...

actually if u r in an oil major, if u perform well quite likely u will be rotated to other positions in supply chain, business planning, or even sales and trading.
if you are experienced, you can also join oil/petrochem consultants companies


Business planners in the company which i did my internship usually are experienced chem. engineers in plant for several years and understand the plant conditions and processes well.Then they will do feasibility studies on plant modifications / new plants from an economic point of view.
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Old 03-01-2009, 10:50 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cosycatus View Post
are u more concern about the reputation of the school or wat you study/will be working as?
the best chemical engineering school is MIT if u really need to get into what you think is a good school. NUS is not even heard of in some parts of US...so is there a diff btwn NUS and NTU to someone who has heard of neither??
Hmm, I am only interested in studying locally, so just wanna compare which is better academically.. So do you mean that there is no preference in the eyes of employers b/w NTU n NUS grads? What about those with honours, 1st class VS 3rd class n VS w/o honours?

Thanks lots. Will be waiting for your 3rd type!
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Old 03-03-2009, 05:24 PM   #15
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Default Women - chemical engineers

Hi I am a singaporean but will be studying in US for chemical engineering. I would like to know if you know how do women find themselves in this field? Where do they work and I read here that they are being paid 3k/mth. ? Thats it? Do people proceed to jobs or graduate studies. Please share your thoughts. Thanks.
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Old 03-04-2009, 07:19 PM   #16
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chi,

unfortunately im a male..lol

u gg US study? i presume its a prestigious uni.. congrats.

pay wise.really depends on company ... 2k+ to 3k+ for starting...
big MNCs usually higher esp oil companies.
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Old 03-04-2009, 09:07 PM   #17
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hi...asdasdasdasd

Last edited by jiashun_sky91; 03-26-2011 at 01:30 AM.
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Old 03-05-2009, 11:23 PM   #18
cosycatus
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sockmui View Post
Hmm, I am only interested in studying locally, so just wanna compare which is better academically.. So do you mean that there is no preference in the eyes of employers b/w NTU n NUS grads? What about those with honours, 1st class VS 3rd class n VS w/o honours?

Thanks lots. Will be waiting for your 3rd type!

Honours is impt actually. How employers sieve out is definitely by results first.
At least get a second upper, which isn't hard.

It doesn't make a difference between NUS or NTU i think. Just that NUS is more establish ( which means more archaic stuff like wat zhjjhz888 mentioned).

Third type of engineers are what i call service related.
They are basically the guys who sell some stuff or service.
Eg, they can be marketing polymers for a chemical plant. They can be your vendors who service equipment, provide a service.
I've a fren who got a fantastic job installing process control system. 1K car allowance, job location changes 3-4 months, going around installing system for people, training in US, regional sales pitching.

In the singapore context, going for graduate studies in chem engineering is quite useless. There is no discernible difference between a Master's or Bachelor. My batch was the first one they offer a dual master's from MIT. ( YES, u really get a masters from Massachusetts institutive of technology, FOC + allowance some more). Those who scramble to join can't find jobs when they come back..

Ideally, chem eng students find it easier to get jobs cos there's system of industrial attachment in place. More often than not, these companies hire u back.
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Old 03-06-2009, 02:13 PM   #19
zhjjhz888
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cosycatus View Post
Honours is impt actually. How employers sieve out is definitely by results first.
At least get a second upper, which isn't hard.

It doesn't make a difference between NUS or NTU i think. Just that NUS is more establish ( which means more archaic stuff like wat zhjjhz888 mentioned).

Third type of engineers are what i call service related.
They are basically the guys who sell some stuff or service.
Eg, they can be marketing polymers for a chemical plant. They can be your vendors who service equipment, provide a service.
I've a fren who got a fantastic job installing process control system. 1K car allowance, job location changes 3-4 months, going around installing system for people, training in US, regional sales pitching.

In the singapore context, going for graduate studies in chem engineering is quite useless. There is no discernible difference between a Master's or Bachelor. My batch was the first one they offer a dual master's from MIT. ( YES, u really get a masters from Massachusetts institutive of technology, FOC + allowance some more). Those who scramble to join can't find jobs when they come back..

Ideally, chem eng students find it easier to get jobs cos there's system of industrial attachment in place. More often than not, these companies hire u back.

these kind of engineers oso known as sales engineers... they might need to travel regularly... i still remember during internship i had a hard time contacting these sales engineers and sales managers when i need data from them...haha.. i tried calling to thailand, korea, and even monaco...

anyway cosycatus wat sector r u in now?
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Old 03-06-2009, 09:42 PM   #20
cosycatus
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oil...........
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