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Old 02-27-2018, 12:07 PM   #1
Paddington
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Default Healthcare Engineering University Options

Hi!

For an A level graduate, what options are there in university to lead to being able to design medical technology, or healthcare engineering? With medicine as the first choice, I am thinking about a second choice in case of failure in all the medicine interviews both overseas and local.

I am aware of the SUTD-Duke NUS and NUS Engineering-Duke NUS paths but they may also be difficult to get into. For NUS Engineering-Duke NUS path, the application guideline states that we only apply for it after being accepted into engineering, what if someone gets rejected by Duke NUS, are they forced to stay in Engineering?

If we take a normal engineering/computer science course in NUS SUTD or NTU, are there special modules where students can choose to specialise in medical technology and are there opportunities to work in this area in Singapore? Even as an engineer or computer scientist, I don't think I will like to work in other areas other than healthcare.

Thank you very much!
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Old 02-28-2018, 06:32 PM   #2
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If you are applying for both overseas and local, there is pretty high chance that you are able to secure at least an offer.

Even if you don't, you can still try for the Duke-NUS paths. Let's just say that if you still don't get in, you can try for pre-med programme which will increase your chances of getting in.

It's possible to get rejected during the Duke-NUS path if you don't hit the minimum requirements.That's why you choose a major that you like and if you are still interested in medicine, you can even try for graduate entry medicine overseas.

If you are interested in healthcare engineering,I will recommend you to take up biomedical engineering as the last resort.
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Old 03-01-2018, 10:12 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jedrek View Post
If you are applying for both overseas and local, there is pretty high chance that you are able to secure at least an offer.

Even if you don't, you can still try for the Duke-NUS paths. Let's just say that if you still don't get in, you can try for pre-med programme which will increase your chances of getting in.

It's possible to get rejected during the Duke-NUS path if you don't hit the minimum requirements.That's why you choose a major that you like and if you are still interested in medicine, you can even try for graduate entry medicine overseas.

If you are interested in healthcare engineering,I will recommend you to take up biomedical engineering as the last resort.
Ok! Then I'll probably wait for replies from UK before applying for the SUTD Duke NUS program. Actually another reason why I may prefer Duke NUS is because there are more scholarship options to lower the cost, but I am also aware of the PEG offered for overseas medicine just that I'm not sure it will be enough haha. Ya good point some requirements still need to be met to enter Duke NUS like 509 on MCAT.

In terms of the cost, for Singaporeans, how different is it studying through Duke NUS path, medicine in the UK outside London and medicine in Australia?

Thanks again!
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Old 03-02-2018, 11:40 PM   #4
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Duke NUS is cheaper compared than the rest,but the opportunity cost isn't worth it if you are eligible for undergraduate medicine overseas.

The time spent to get through graduate medical school can be spent working and worse thing is that it is harder since you need to maintain a certain gpa and get a pretty good Mcat score.

Just go for undergraduate if you can,unless you can't get into medical school overseas. I am trying for graduate medical school in future,since I didn't really fared well for the A levels and I can tell you that even though you are majoring in an undergraduate degree that you like, you still have to worry about gpa and mcat,which shouldn't be an issue if you try for undergraduate medicine.

Medicine in the Uk outside London, is generally cheaper because of the lower cost of living. Most medical schools tend to situate in London,but there are quite a number outside London that are still pretty recognised like Bristol/Aberdeen.

Medicine in Australia is more expensive than the Uk due to the increasing indexation of the school fees.And if you are looking at saving your $$, you could go for the 5yr ones like Monash,Newcastle and Tasmania. The rest are mainly 6yr ones and 1 additional yr costs quite a lot.

Not so sure if the PEG is guaranteed,but I wouldn't place my odds on it since it's pretty competitive. Be prepared for the finances, just in case.
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Old 03-16-2018, 07:04 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jedrek View Post
Duke NUS is cheaper compared than the rest,but the opportunity cost isn't worth it if you are eligible for undergraduate medicine overseas.

The time spent to get through graduate medical school can be spent working and worse thing is that it is harder since you need to maintain a certain gpa and get a pretty good Mcat score.

Just go for undergraduate if you can,unless you can't get into medical school overseas. I am trying for graduate medical school in future,since I didn't really fared well for the A levels and I can tell you that even though you are majoring in an undergraduate degree that you like, you still have to worry about gpa and mcat,which shouldn't be an issue if you try for undergraduate medicine.

Medicine in the Uk outside London, is generally cheaper because of the lower cost of living. Most medical schools tend to situate in London,but there are quite a number outside London that are still pretty recognised like Bristol/Aberdeen.

Medicine in Australia is more expensive than the Uk due to the increasing indexation of the school fees.And if you are looking at saving your $$, you could go for the 5yr ones like Monash,Newcastle and Tasmania. The rest are mainly 6yr ones and 1 additional yr costs quite a lot.

Not so sure if the PEG is guaranteed,but I wouldn't place my odds on it since it's pretty competitive. Be prepared for the finances, just in case.
Thank you for your advice! I'm thankful to be eligible to go to Barts in London for undergrad Med, but I'm still going to apply locally, NUS, NTU, Duke NUS, and will probably choose Duke NUS over going to London if possible, it's really quite far. The MCAT is possible to retake it, I guess making it slightly better.

You're so helpful and determined to study Med, haha I really hope you'll become a doctor one day and be a great one too!
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Old 03-17-2018, 09:52 AM   #6
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I will still recommend you to go for Uk though,no bias here since I am going towards the post-graduate route.

In summary, Go for undergraduate>> If you really want to do medicine, unsure of alternative options whether they are good or bad (the undergraduate degree you plan to pursue),can't be bothered to take MCAT/GAMSAT (both are way harder than BMAT,don't underestimate the two tests)

Go for graduate>> If you are alright with going through the same but harder admission process(postgraduate is harder than undergraduate), have guaranteed entry into a Duke-NUS engineering-medicine track(worth it), not put down by numerous factors that might hinder your progress in university(there is many circumstances that might affect your performance in university,totally different ball game from A levels),perfectly fine any day to pursue your alternative field should you not get a place in medical school, looking to do some soul-searching in your uni to decide if medicine is really for you(big investment of time and money).

I think graduate entry medicine is nice and I gotten over the idea that it is less ideal than undergraduate because undergraduate process in uni,gives you more time to judge whether you are really capable of being a doctor in the future or not. In any case,medical students in graduate schools tend to be more prepared and ready,compared to those in undergraduate.
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