BrightSparks Forum

Go Back   BrightSparks Singapore Scholarship & Higher Education Forum > University > Local > Comparison
Click Here if you forgot your password.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 05-08-2016, 03:09 PM   #1
coolkid17
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2016
Posts: 3
coolkid17 has a neutral reputation
Default NTU Lee Kong Chian vs Imperial Medicine

Hey guys! I recently got an offer from Lee Kong Chian for medicine, and I also applied to UK med schools. In the UK, I currently have offers from Imperial College London, Barts The London School of Medicine and Queen's Belfast University. I think I've narrowed it down to Imperial College London and NTU's Lee Kong Chian, but I'm not sure of how to proceed from here.

Fees are definitely an issue, but less so when I consider the possibility of the pre-employment grant for Imperial. I know that I want to come back to Singapore right after medical school, but I'm not sure of the far future. I feel that while Imperial paves the way for a more global future, NTU's joint degree with Imperial would be better for staying in Singapore. It would allow me to make connections here which are important for residency programmes.

I also find NTU to be a very nice a friendly university, while Imperial is on the more prestigious side and maybe not as open which could be due in part to the large cohort size and the fact that it's in a foreign country. NTU makes more practical sense both in the fees and staying in Singapore aspects, but I'm still hung up on the global recognition of Imperial and the draw of studying somewhere else- going out of my comfort zone and understanding another culture. I think it'll be a very scary yet enlightening journey, but it does come at a price especially if I don't get the pre-employment grant. Even with the grant, with the addition of living and transportation costs, it adds up to quite a substantial bit.

But besides that, the recognition also matters. I think NTU is a great school. It has wonderful facilities, a modern and beautiful campus, and a tightly bonded medical faculty. But on a global scale Imperial is far ahead of NTU. I'm unsure of how much the partnership between Lee Kong Chian and Imperial counts towards it's global recognition, and I guess I'm also wondering if it makes a difference in hospitals. Do senior officials or doctors care which medical school you come from? Does Imperial hold much more sway than NTU in terms of being an indicator of capability and knowledge?

Thanks so much for your time and help.
coolkid17 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2016, 03:46 PM   #2
hoseh
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 89
hoseh has a neutral reputation
Default

Study in the country where you want to practise.

But you will never be too sure of where you exactly want to practise even though you might be pretty firm in wanting to go back to/ stay in singapore after graduation.

It is a tough decision. You should list out your priorities and think about them: cost, future job prospects etc. Don't worry too much about the quality of medical graduates each school churns out; they are all competent enough to function in hospitals and there will always be something good and bad about each med school.

I am not too sure if international students have any difficulty getting internships in UK so that's something you might want to find out. Going back to singapore as a foreign grad is also likely to put you at a disadvantage when compared to your local peers.

Btw, I don't know how long the other med schools (that you were offered) are... but you might want to just enter the shortest course (i.e. reconsider imperial iirc it's 6 yrs). I think it is more practical and you get to start working in hospitals 1 yr ahead of the people in the 6 yr med schools. The experience you get from working and the salary you draw will be much more practical than the extra year spent in school, unless the school happens to offer for e.g. a year of research which happens to be your interest as well then go for it.

Lastly, I personally think it is good to go abroad and gain a broader perspective on things because westerners do things really differently from asians e.g. style of teaching etc. I am not too sure if they managed to incorporate much of the westerner's methods into LKC but I am skeptical about it. There are certain things that Caucasians can do but Asians can't and vice versa.

Don't be too bothered by the PEG if you were to go overseas unless you really need the money. You might actually find that you prefer living and working in UK and the PEG is going to close so many doors that could be available to you in the future.

Regarding reputation etc, I would tend to think that foreign med grads, cambridge or harvard etc, would ultimately be viewed as second class compared to local grads but take this with a huge pinch of salt. That being said, no one really cares about which school you came from after the initial period of self-introduction and socialising and employers would probably value a hardworking employee from a lowly ranked school than a lazy bum from harvard. I really don't think you should pay too much attention to recognition or reputation, it is still a medical degree at the end of the day...

Edit: regarding the last para, I would like to clarify certain things. Of course a prestigious degree has its use but most healthcare systems around the world expects the graduate to work a couple of years in the hospital before applying for their specializations so in this case, work performance and supervisor's recommendation would probably be more important than the primary degree itself.

Last edited by hoseh; 05-08-2016 at 03:50 PM.
hoseh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2016, 03:58 PM   #3
coolkid17
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2016
Posts: 3
coolkid17 has a neutral reputation
Default

Thanks so much for your advice @hoseh. I'll definitely think about this seriously. To be honest the matter of a 6 year vs 5 year course doesn't pose a very huge issue for me. I think getting a BSc during that extra year will be advantageous in its own way, and for me at least, it cancels out the inconvenience and cost of an extra year.

LKC's style of teaching is quite westernised I think, it's not a traditional lecture based system at all. But I think going overseas for me is more about personal development and exploring new horizons. I'm just not sure if it justifies the cost and being away from family :/

Thanks so much for your advice though, I really have to get my priorities straightened out.
coolkid17 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2016, 04:50 AM   #4
hoseh
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 89
hoseh has a neutral reputation
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by coolkid17 View Post
Thanks so much for your advice @hoseh. I'll definitely think about this seriously. To be honest the matter of a 6 year vs 5 year course doesn't pose a very huge issue for me. I think getting a BSc during that extra year will be advantageous in its own way, and for me at least, it cancels out the inconvenience and cost of an extra year.

LKC's style of teaching is quite westernised I think, it's not a traditional lecture based system at all. But I think going overseas for me is more about personal development and exploring new horizons. I'm just not sure if it justifies the cost and being away from family :/

Thanks so much for your advice though, I really have to get my priorities straightened out.
Just out of curiosity, why do you think a BSc will be advantageous?

Like I said above, there are certain things that only Caucasians can do. As much as med schools all over the world claim that they are moving away from traditional lecture and tutorial system to the PBL or TBL or etc XBL system, sometimes you really need to be in an environment with Caucasians for that to happen. That's not to say that it doesn't work in Singapore but it is hard to make a comparison because most people only attend one med school and get exposed to only one style of teaching.

Going overseas will definitely make you grow a lot more than staying in Singapore because you will have to think about everything from accommodations to meals to dealing with homesickness etc etc. It is a huge amount of money but it is worth spending it if you were to choose to to go overseas.
hoseh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2016, 09:58 PM   #5
coolkid17
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2016
Posts: 3
coolkid17 has a neutral reputation
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by hoseh View Post
Just out of curiosity, why do you think a BSc will be advantageous?

Like I said above, there are certain things that only Caucasians can do. As much as med schools all over the world claim that they are moving away from traditional lecture and tutorial system to the PBL or TBL or etc XBL system, sometimes you really need to be in an environment with Caucasians for that to happen. That's not to say that it doesn't work in Singapore but it is hard to make a comparison because most people only attend one med school and get exposed to only one style of teaching.

Going overseas will definitely make you grow a lot more than staying in Singapore because you will have to think about everything from accommodations to meals to dealing with homesickness etc etc. It is a huge amount of money but it is worth spending it if you were to choose to to go overseas.
I see where you're coming from. Yeah going overseas definitely has its advantages and perks. I think it really helps you grow as a person. The practicality of the situation matters to me though. I'll probably venture out of my comfort zone later on in life when I have my own resources and means to do so. Meanwhile I think living in Halls in NTU also comes with a few valuable lessons I can learn along the way. And as unconventional as their teaching method is, it seems to work quite well for the students there, so I'm hoping it'll be good for our batch as well. I do love the teaching style so hopefully I'll benefit from it more.

The BSc to me is an additional selling point of sorts. It not only allows you to further explore a branch of medicine/science you're interested in, but also hones your knowledge and essentially shows your future employers that you are capable of a BSc. It's also the shortest possible pathway to obtain an extra degree- just 1 more year instead of the normal 3 that would normally lead to a BSc. It's just something you can fall back on too if the whole medicine thing goes awry and you want a career in research. That's my opinion!
coolkid17 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2016, 04:16 AM   #6
hoseh
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 89
hoseh has a neutral reputation
Default

Once again, think about what your main priorities are. To do resesrch, you still have to be the cream of the crop in the BSc programme and if you thibk that's something you can fall back on then perhaps you might want to rethink about it. Of course it is something extra for you to mention to your emplpyers but just bear in mind that research isn't for everyone and for most, the letters that come after that MBBS matter much more than the ones that came before it.

All the best.
hoseh is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
barts, comparison, imperial college london, medicine, ntu lee kong chian

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +8. The time now is 04:42 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.