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Old 10-21-2009, 08:14 PM   #11
RickSteves
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What's wrong with studying something which you are interested in? There's more to life than getting a stable job which brings in good money.
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Old 10-22-2009, 12:13 AM   #12
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each has his own opinion.for mine,i'm really sorry to say,Sg society rarely allows people to do what they really want.I like life science but circumstances got me into engineering. people who chose wad they want usually comes at a price,for e.g pay cut?like engineer grads' pay differ alot from art grads'? Money makes Singapore go round xD
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Old 10-22-2009, 09:23 AM   #13
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Sg society rarely allows people to do what they really want.I like life science but circumstances got me into engineering. people who chose wad they want usually comes at a price,for e.g pay cut?like engineer grads' pay differ alot from art grads'?
I won't comment about life science in Singapore... but I followed my interests and studied social science in singapore and I'm earning a very comfortable wage.

To say that sg society rarely allows people to do what they really want is just a self-defeating prophecy and an easy way to wash responsibility off your hands. The fact is that singaporeans are just too obsessed with money, meeting their material wants and keeping up with their peers (look at the number of threads in the career section which asks about how to get the jobs which pay the best), that they are willing to sacrifice on their interest.

Besides, the fact that engineering grads are paid more than arts grads is not something unique to singapore. What's wrong with paying a price to do what you want? Life is full of choices and the choice here is how much you can sacrifice on interest or money. I have rejected very interesting jobs which did not pay well but I have also rejected highly paid jobs which were very boring. Everyone has different thresholds for interest/money and the choice is always yours to make. To blame everything on external factors (blame govt, blame society, blame edu system etc etc etc) really is quite typical of Singaporeans.
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Old 10-22-2009, 09:30 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by RickSteves View Post
I won't comment about life science in Singapore... but I followed my interests and studied social science in singapore and I'm earning a very comfortable wage.

To say that sg society rarely allows people to do what they really want is just a self-defeating prophecy and an easy way to wash responsibility off your hands. The fact is that singaporeans are just too obsessed with money, meeting their material wants and keeping up with their peers (look at the number of threads in the career section which asks about how to get the jobs which pay the best), that they are willing to sacrifice on their interest.

Besides, the fact that engineering grads are paid more than arts grads is not something unique to singapore. What's wrong with paying a price to do what you want? Life is full of choices and the choice here is how much you can sacrifice on interest or money. I have rejected very interesting jobs which did not pay well but I have also rejected highly paid jobs which were very boring. Everyone has different thresholds for interest/money and the choice is always yours to make. To blame everything on external factors (blame govt, blame society, blame edu system etc etc etc) really is quite typical of Singaporeans.
You can say that the range of careers available in a small country like Singapore is limiting. If you are in the U.S. or the EU for example, you have a wider range of options.

For example, if you want to be aeronautical engineer, Singapore doesn't make planes or fighter jets.
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Old 10-22-2009, 09:49 PM   #15
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You can say that the range of careers available in a small country like Singapore is limiting. If you are in the U.S. or the EU for example, you have a wider range of options.

For example, if you want to be aeronautical engineer, Singapore doesn't make planes or fighter jets.
It's true that Singapore does not produce planes, but as Singapore aims to be a aerospace hub, I'm sure that many planes would stop by here to get repairs. Not to mention our government might need aerospace engineers too, especially in the air force.

But I agree that compared to countries like the US, there's still a relative lack of demand for aerospace engineers here.

Just my two cents worth.
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Old 10-23-2009, 12:41 AM   #16
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On the issue of trading passion for money, I have this to say: If you find a job that pays you what you want to earn for doing what you want to do--you've hit jackpot! But more often, there is a tradeoff.

Ultimately, it's your personal choice. You are well within your rights to choose how much of your passion to trade off in exchange for how much money--and no bystander is worthy to judge you for that decision (though of course many will, publicly or privately). Society does not owe you a living--so if you do not do something that "adds value" to another human being's life, there is no reason for him or society to pay you anything. If you can find a literature consulting firm to hire you, akin to the history consulting firm you mentioned, great. Otherwise you may have to be entrepreneurial and startup your own lit consulting firm--or else find some other way your knowledge of lit will be of service to your fellow man if no established path exists.

In the case of obscure passions (like aero engine), if the Singapore economy does not support your passion, you're well within your rights to leave and find some country/company that will pay you to do what you're passionate about. Of course, you'll have to weigh that against leaving family/friends/sentimentality behind before making that decision. But again: if your country doesn't "want" you (only in the sense that it can't employ or use you), then there is an unfortunate mismatch and something may need to be done (such as migration or you settling for some job that isn't in line with what you originally wanted).

Am I recommending a mercenary, "what's best for me" approach? Perhaps, but in a more enlightened, ethical way. I believe the individual should respect society, and society the individual. Therefore I simply advocate a reasoned, cost-vs-benefit way of thinking. Make your choice based on as much info as you can gather. Then walk down that path with equanimity, enjoying both the benefits and the pitfalls of your choice. For the majority of Singaporeans, blessed with an able body, sound mind and an opportunity to obtain higher education, there is always a choice.
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Old 10-23-2009, 02:49 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by DukeBlue View Post
On the issue of trading passion for money, I have this to say: If you find a job that pays you what you want to earn for doing what you want to do--you've hit jackpot! But more often, there is a tradeoff.

Ultimately, it's your personal choice. You are well within your rights to choose how much of your passion to trade off in exchange for how much money--and no bystander is worthy to judge you for that decision (though of course many will, publicly or privately). Society does not owe you a living--so if you do not do something that "adds value" to another human being's life, there is no reason for him or society to pay you anything. If you can find a literature consulting firm to hire you, akin to the history consulting firm you mentioned, great. Otherwise you may have to be entrepreneurial and startup your own lit consulting firm--or else find some other way your knowledge of lit will be of service to your fellow man if no established path exists.

In the case of obscure passions (like aero engine), if the Singapore economy does not support your passion, you're well within your rights to leave and find some country/company that will pay you to do what you're passionate about. Of course, you'll have to weigh that against leaving family/friends/sentimentality behind before making that decision. But again: if your country doesn't "want" you (only in the sense that it can't employ or use you), then there is an unfortunate mismatch and something may need to be done (such as migration or you settling for some job that isn't in line with what you originally wanted).

Am I recommending a mercenary, "what's best for me" approach? Perhaps, but in a more enlightened, ethical way. I believe the individual should respect society, and society the individual. Therefore I simply advocate a reasoned, cost-vs-benefit way of thinking. Make your choice based on as much info as you can gather. Then walk down that path with equanimity, enjoying both the benefits and the pitfalls of your choice. For the majority of Singaporeans, blessed with an able body, sound mind and an opportunity to obtain higher education, there is always a choice.
I reckon u've read plato's republic
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Old 10-23-2009, 06:01 PM   #18
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Reckon I have =)

Though it's not purely philosophical knowledge, but also life experience that my powers my writing. Imagine a 2-circle Venn diagram, with one circle being "Knowledge" and the other circle being "Life experience/maturity". In the overlapping area, that is what I think is called wisdom--the synergy of being both knowledgeable and rich in experiences. Not that I have a lot of that yet, but optimally that overlapping area should be increasing in size as we age. =)
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Last edited by DukeBlue; 10-23-2009 at 06:03 PM.
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Old 10-24-2009, 03:52 AM   #19
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Reckon I have =)

Though it's not purely philosophical knowledge, but also life experience that my powers my writing. Imagine a 2-circle Venn diagram, with one circle being "Knowledge" and the other circle being "Life experience/maturity". In the overlapping area, that is what I think is called wisdom--the synergy of being both knowledgeable and rich in experiences. Not that I have a lot of that yet, but optimally that overlapping area should be increasing in size as we age. =)
Yeah I agree with you. Wisdom is where knowledge and Life experience meets. Oh yeah, I see you are a double major in English and Economics, I'm thinking of doing a double major in Economics too, my professor's kinda urging me to do it. I just wanna know what's Managerial and Intermediate Economics about, care to shed some light on it ?
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Last edited by koo86; 10-24-2009 at 03:55 AM.
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Old 10-24-2009, 08:59 PM   #20
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I just wanna know what's Managerial and Intermediate Economics about, care to shed some light on it ?
I'm afraid I have no idea what Managerial Economics is--it sounds more businesslike than the usual academic type of Econs usually taught in uni. Intermediate Economics sounds like a mid-level class, but again the name is really vague so I can't guess anything about it. You should probably find out more via friends/seniors in the same uni who've taken those classes.
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