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Old 05-25-2009, 08:43 AM   #11
sonrocker
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Alright alright, chill yea. Thanks for offering ur views.
Btw spencer i'm just wondering if a degree in NTU maths&econs will provide a good preparation for a career in finance-related field?
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Old 05-25-2009, 10:47 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by spencer View Post
With the exception that I'm not a Singaporean.
errr ok... so now you don't even have an excuse for being so utilitarian

sonrocker: many math & econs grads go into finance (at least prior to the recession) because of their strong quantitative foundation. however, I'm not sure whether the NTU degree will be viewed as favourably as graduates from established math & econs programmes at foreign universities.
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Old 05-25-2009, 10:55 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cleanerdung;

sonrocker: many math & econs grads go into finance (at least prior to the recession) because of their strong quantitative foundation. however, I'm not sure whether the NTU degree will be viewed as favourably as graduates from established math & econs programmes at foreign universities.
U've answered my qn. Thanks
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Old 05-25-2009, 10:48 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by sonrocker View Post
Alright alright, chill yea. Thanks for offering ur views.
Btw spencer i'm just wondering if a degree in NTU maths&econs will provide a good preparation for a career in finance-related field?
Recruiters will bin your CV due to the NTU name. For getting into finance, the university is more important than the course. You can almost certainly get into finance if you read just about any course in Harvard.
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Old 05-25-2009, 11:58 PM   #15
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They are not professional; maths and chemistry would be very good foundation degrees for higher degrees.

Avoid Psychology.
Mind explaining why avoid psychology ?
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Old 05-26-2009, 02:13 AM   #16
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Mind explaining why avoid psychology ?
what a silly question
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Old 05-26-2009, 02:39 AM   #17
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what a silly question
A simple yes would have sufficed if you did not want to explain.
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Old 05-26-2009, 08:41 AM   #18
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what a silly question
an expected response from someone who disregards the value of an education in the social sciences.
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Old 05-26-2009, 08:49 AM   #19
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Recruiters will bin your CV due to the NTU name. For getting into finance, the university is more important than the course. You can almost certainly get into finance if you read just about any course in Harvard.
Ur reply makes me wonder why the university is more important than the course U mean they dun care what u specialise in and just anyhow offer u a place just because u are from the top school, regardless of whether u can perform? How true is this in the singapore market, to say the least? U are speaking from experience i guess? [ from the perspective of a recruiter or a job-seeker ]
Awaiting ur reply.

P.S: Talking abt binning CVs, if u have 3 candidates in hands [ 1 nus, 1 ntu, 1 smu ], assuming the course they took doesnt matter, which one would u pick just for a finance job?
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Old 05-26-2009, 01:17 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sonrocker View Post
Ur reply makes me wonder why the university is more important than the course U mean they dun care what u specialise in and just anyhow offer u a place just because u are from the top school, regardless of whether u can perform? How true is this in the singapore market, to say the least? U are speaking from experience i guess? [ from the perspective of a recruiter or a job-seeker ]
Awaiting ur reply.

P.S: Talking abt binning CVs, if u have 3 candidates in hands [ 1 nus, 1 ntu, 1 smu ], assuming the course they took doesnt matter, which one would u pick just for a finance job?
let's put it in a little perspective. the university name matters much, of course, but i would separate schools that allow you to get into entry-level, front office finance positions into 2 broad categories.

1) globally renowned schools - your harvards, oxfords, whartons et al. these are the schools which will allow you to be globally mobile in your first job. i.e you will be a competitive applicant in the us/europe/asia as long as your grades are sound. the major isn't that important, because most of what you do in finance is learnt on the job anyway. i can safely say i use maybe 20-30% of what i learned formally in my current position. so you get in by virtue of going to a good school, by being well liked by alumni at the firm, and by just basically having your wits about you. it may be unfair, but that's the way it is.

2) regionally renowned schools - now, these schools may not give you as great an opportunity to move to other regions (again, in your first position), but they do give you an opportunity to work in finance in the region you are located. i would put the three local unis here. while cvs from these schools may be binned in london or the us, they are perfectly acceptable in most of asia. i know because i have plenty of friends who graduated from these schools and are now in finance - my local markets fx trading team is almost exclusively made up of NUS graduates (although they are much older - times have changed since). granted, the criteria is more stringent: good grades, relevant or at least quantitative coursework etc. AND, they are probably the 2nd option to #1.

i can probably elucidate further, but i think this description should suffice. i do stress that this is a rough generalization though. i realize that there are outliers, but those should be the exception rather than the rule. as for your other question, i can probably shed some light - i was trying to hire a graduate intern recently and did look at fresh grads from the 3 local schools, in addition to a few other unis. i can honestly say then that i don't think that the school name really matters - the quality of the candidate is much more important. the course of study isn't really critical as well so long as the person is well prepared for the interview. and i think most interviewers will say the same thing
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