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Old 04-27-2008, 04:49 PM   #11
solunablade
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hey ckloh i'm also currently in NS too...was waiting for my AVA scholarship to reply but i think can forget it....just wondering if u're getting any financial aid thru grants or scholarships? since AVA is the only org. that offers this scholarship in vet sci, i was thinking of getting a PR there then see if there's any possible scholarships there then....

and actually i havent been to any job attachments to vet clinics or similar exp, so i feel i'm alittle shorthanded in my "personal statement". my job attachments are more bio-research stuff...so...yea.

any idea when's the next idp event? i need to ask them more about whether i still need the pre-vet year and other stuff....thanks
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Old 04-28-2008, 02:25 PM   #12
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Hey just to point out, A-star used to offer scholarships for vet science too, though i'm not too sure if they still do. Also, getting a PR takes a few years and from my knowledge there are very few scholarships availiable for vet science, much like the situation with medicine scholarship. It's possible to work hard during the course, do extremely well, and be awarded a scholarship by the uni based on your exam scores.(least that is what my uni does)

If you need to know more about pre-vet year, all I can say so far is that it is mostly A-lvl sciences stuff,(in melbourne uni that is) and it can be pretty boring for those who have done them before, but slightly tougher for those who didn't do them before. The pace in uni is pretty quick so you got to be pretty vigilant when it comes to studies. Don't leave everything till a week before the exams to start studying. But most students from singapore do just fine considering how we survived the competitive nature of our education system.

A senior of mine pointed out that doing attachments at vet clinics does give you some advantage over others especially at the beginning of clinical years, so it would be advisable to give it a try. You will probably meet other vet students n vets which you can direct any other doubts you have to.

Hope this helps. Good luck!
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Old 05-01-2008, 11:02 PM   #13
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hi...

you can try A-star scholarship if you're interested in laboratory veterinary medicine. there was an A-star scholar at Murdoch University, who graduated just last year. And if you're interested in large animals/ regulatory work than AVA scholarship. If you haven't made up your mind which field of veterinary medicine you want to be involved (or you want to do small animals, or clinical site of veterinary medicine and surgery)... then i am afraid, to my knowledge, no such scholarship exists in Singapore.

don't rely on getting scholarships from vet medical faculty overseas as a foreign student. I haven't known anyone getting a scholarship that way before. the scholarships if any, are for extra research honors year (which is additional year of study out of the usual veterinary vet curriculum). Further, being a PR before starting vet school doesn't exempt you from full fee paying in Australia. the next option is to get a sponsership from AVA once you are in vet school (but it means you must already be aware of the type of job you will do after you graduate, cos there is a bond).

at least at Murdoch University, if you have no prior animal experience, there's no way you will clear the "3 category test" admission selection. even if you pass the first 2 category, you wouldn't pass the animal experience category. so stellar grades alone doesn't guarantee a place at Murdoch vet school. It is crucial that you know what being a vet entails. it is a calling, and full of hardwork. it is definitely not glamorous. you work with cattle and horses that defecate anytime they like (even on you). you have to be healthy and be prepared to climb fences (sometimes to escape from attacking bulls) can be a part of large animal vet consultancy/ practice. sick dogs and geriatric dogs... and ferocious cats are not CUTE...the list goes on. but yes, there's the opportunity to handle a whole list of animals, from petting a giraffe to anesthetising snakes to examining lions to doing anatomical pathology on dolphins.... and those puppies and .... the list goes on too! =D And often, you are globally mobile-- you can work anywhere.

Further, be prepared to learn dentistry (yes, you have to do it!), surgery (yes! if you graduate from a recognised vet school, you are immediately a surgeon and is qualified to apply for membership to the royal collage of vet surgeon without need for further exams), anesthesia (this is routine), radiology (including CT and scintigraphy...safety....), opthomology, farm consultancy, animal behaviour.... and the list goes on. you have a whole list of different animal physiology and anatomy to memorise. then the list of different drug allergies with different animals to remember... including different anaesthesia drugs and dose rate for different induction for different species, even breed differentiation, etc.... so it is crucial you know what you're getting yourself into.

for the amount of things you have to know and have to do in practise, the salary is not attractive.

good luck! feel free to contact me if you need more details. i'll attempt to reply.
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Old 05-27-2008, 03:25 PM   #14
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hmm icic...sounds challenging but interesting nevertheless. what i worry more is the financial support i have to endure thru this course...For A*star i would need to do SAT which i didnt so i guess that limits me to only AVA. Plus i think i'm looking at something not too related to research....

i was thinking if there's any attachment available so i can get a better feel at what i would be doing...end up i came back to this forum. is calling to various vet clinics the only way to check out if they accept interns?
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Old 05-30-2008, 09:31 AM   #15
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you have to check with A-star for their requirements; that is, if you like laboratory animal veterinary medicine. if you're getting an AVA scholarship, you will be dealing with large animals and regulatory work; that is, NO small animal medicine.

It is called volunteer work, not "intern".

you can sure call vet clinics (but remember if you're going for an AVA scholarship, small animal medicine is not what you will do when you graduate). If you like zoo medicine, there is the Singapore zoo. the possibilities are limited by your imagination and your resourcefulness. the best thing you can do is volunteer at a few places and in different capacities/ fields, and get a feel if you really do want to be in this industry. clicking animal contact time is essential for application to some vet school (eg. Murdoch University)
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Old 06-04-2008, 07:14 PM   #16
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Hi all, just thought I clear up some things about vet school! First of all, its really silly to think that the entry requirements say anything about the university you're applying to - there are a lot of factors you have to consider.

There is definitely no 'best' uni for vet science, though many Singaporeans would probably say Murdoch. This is because there is a huge number of Singaporeans studying at Murdoch. This is not to say that Murdoch isn't good though; it's got accreditation and a very conveniently located farm on campus, and from what I hear, an excellent reputation too, though more specifically for vet science rather than other faculties.

Sydney and Melbourne are excellent universities too, with what I think are the best international reputations around in the country, and out of all the 7 vet schools in Australia. You definitely have a smaller intake of students in each compared to Murdoch, and you'll have the benefit of a big city living, a school that's very balanced in other faculty reputations, and of course, these are the best unis in the country. They have excellent vet facilities and are the two oldest vet schools in the country.

Queensland is the last australian vet school that's open for internationals to apply for - you can practise in singapore after you graduate from UQ, but UQ doesn't have AVMA accredition unlike the other two - that's something you may want to consider if you wanted to take your vet career overseas.

THat said, I think the entry requirements and application process also need some clarification. There are more vet schools in some states than in others - this will be adjusted and reflected by the entry requirements and of the demand of students that apply every year. Dont forget also that international places are very limited - there is quota they have to meet!

Lastly, I think I'll just add - Vet school is something you'll want to consider very carefully. Observing a vet clinic for two weeks is something, but pursuing a degree as a vet is wholly very demanding. It is definitely not easy, it is a expensive investment (scholarship bonds are also very long, which you should think twice about - you really may regret not keeping your options open, especially when you see many other veterinary experience opportunities overseas), and expect long hours at school. Also expect to be dealing with very difficult animals, most of whom are sick, dirty and sometimes just....uncompliant and aggressive.

From what I know, there are high dropout rates in my degree, because many people will decide this is not the job for them, or because they've failed to meet requirements to promote. Think carefully, but also know that with the challange lies an extremely fulfilling career!
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Old 06-04-2008, 07:29 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckloh View Post
Hi riane,

wah! so many questions. no worries, I'll answer them.

First of all, I applied to Murdoch, Queensland and Sydney. I'm aiming for Murdoch. The application procedure was pretty simple..I actually took the application form at suntec where they had an exhibition every year for studying overseas. you should keep a lookout in the newspaper for such exhibitions, there's one on Murdoch Uni today and tomorrow at suntec! (1st Mar & 2nd Mar). It was a pretty long application form so I completed at home and then I went to the agency (Aus-Ed) to submit, together with my O lvl and A lvl results and all the relevant docs. Normally they will send the forms over before end of May. If you need any help, you can contact me as I know the agent quite well (for at least 3 years already!) Application processes are very similar throughout unis abroad.

Now onto the next qn. In fact, Murdoch Uni is the best Uni in Australia for Vet Science. It requires at least a AAB for A lvls. It has good reputation and more importantly, it is the only uni to have the farm in its own campus! well, for me, I think it'll save alot of travelling time and transport costs As the last 2 years it's be alot on clinical and hands on work, so it is relevant to have the farm in the campus instead of having one in the outskirts of the city.

Ok, here's how the course works for different uni. Queensland requires students to do a pre-vet year such that it will be a requirement to be admitted into the second year. For murdoch, sydney and melbourne, they all teaches Bio on the 1st year, pretty much like A lvl Bio. It's a foundation for all. There's no uni I'd reccommend if you're venturing into wildlife veterinary cos I'm also heading towards wildlife vet life after I'm done with a few years of urban clinical practices.

Regarding applying for a bio course in NTU/NUS, I don't think it'll be necessary. Cos the duration of vet sci itself is already 5 years, I don't think it'll be practical to go for another 3-4 year bio course locally. Yup, you can speak to the agents at display booths when they come! (I'll leave my email address so you can email me directly, or even you can also send your hp no. to me in the email so I can sms you to let you know about the exhibitions coming up and you can plan for it.)

Alright, lastly. Once you send ur application to australia, normally the uni will go thru a few phases to approve ur application. For Murdoch it's 4 phases in a year, meaning they will eg. select 8 students in Mar, another 8 in June, 8 in Sept and 8 in Dec. Those who did not get selected in the 1st phase will be pushed to the next phase and so on. So if they reply you that they have selected you, you'd have to pay the 1st year tution fee in order to confirm ur place. If you decided not to go to that uni, you can choose not to pay and they will remove ur name from the list. simple isn't it. haha.

yuppie. That's all. email me at [email protected] if you're comfortable.

Take care and best of luck for the upcoming release of results!

CK
Hi Ck

just thought i'd clarify some things.

the entry requirements of each uni remains very open. AAB is a minimum and i know for a fact that one probably would need at least that - but it doesn't give a guarantee that you'll get in. on the other hand, it doesn't mean that you won't either - everything depends on the quota of your uni, and demand for vet places - these are very transient and change often. I don't hink I could put a definite answer to WHAT exactly the requirements are, but as a good guide, you'd probably need to aim to do well in your exams. For Sydney and Melbourne locals, you generally need to be the best 1% in your HSC/VCE exams to qualify, which I hope is a helpful indication!

As for what you study in your first year - it all depends on different unis once again. Melbourne has recently adopted the Melbourne model, which hopeful applicants should probably go check out. Its an interesting idea which has raised much creative debate in Australia as to how university curriculum should be structured. There are possible transfer options I'm aware of, for Murdoch students. This includes transfers from Biomedical Science - though once again, this is also fairly new. Sydney I'm quite sure, covers quite a lot of material like Anatomy and husbandry in the first year alone - so its definitely not just a foundation.

Another thing that has to be considered is the degree length - although it is a five year course in Melb for example, is it four years for postgraduates. Or Sydney's fifth year for example, is actually lecture-free and consists of rotations, the flexibility of which can actually be completed overseas.
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Old 06-08-2008, 10:13 AM   #18
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Hi, i am sitting for O lvls this year and i am still indecisive whether to be a vet or not. I have heard that a degree in veterinary med is actually expensive so i will like to know how much is the school fee. Besides that, may i know if it's ok to go poly instead of jc to take up a vet degree? What's the salary of a vet like?

Thanks.
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Old 06-08-2008, 05:29 PM   #19
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Hi kochels,

school fees for Australian universities are around 35000-40000 AUD per year, excluding living costs. Living costs differ from city to city and could range from 10000-20000 AUD depending on the type of accommodation and living style.

I would say it is easier and faster to go through JC in order to study vet science. For the vet course offered by Temasek poly, it is a diploma course, which means you can only practise as a vet nurse upon graduation. The course does not train you to be a veterinarian, and you cannot register as a veterinarian with a diploma. The only way to become a veterinarian is to get a degree in vet science from a university recognised by the AVA. The easiest way to get accepted into vet school is by doing A-levels. I’m not too sure what the new A-level system is like, but under the old A-level system 3As including chemistry and one other science is good enough to be accepted into some universities like Melbourne and Sydney.

From what I’ve heard from seniors and vets, the salary isn’t very high. Some people say it is not worth the pay. If you want to do vet, you should be more in it because it is your passion. It is not an easy course with long hours and tough curriculum. But if you really love animals at the end of the day it will be worth it.
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Old 06-09-2008, 08:55 AM   #20
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Ok thanks a lot for your information. How about universities in NZ or even Japan? I realised that there are veterinary schools in Japan but i am not sure if they accept foreign students. Pardon me for my ignorance.

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