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Old 02-18-2009, 11:11 PM   #21
spencer
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Originally Posted by patryn33 View Post
THES is interesting..
ANU is place ahead of Stanford. ppl from poly with GPA 2.6 are getting into ANU to do engineering. ANU must be great can turn Dirt into Gold.
even monash is placed ahead of LSE, Darmouth. another great uni that turn dirt to gold.
no offence to those LSE or Stanford grads, seem like Platinum went in and out comes Silver.
no wonder today some ppl are highlighting their uni ranking in their resume.
anyone in HR and whats their take on it?

NUS is also way ahead of many renown Uni from berekely, Darmouth to LSE.
no wonder we call it our local ives!

BTW: whats THES methodolgy to make it a bible in world ranking? PRC seem to buy into the SHJT ranking.
even those lowly ranked Russian uni Com Sci grads did find their way into the valley liao does that mean on avg those grads perform as good as those MIT/Stanford grads? if we dig deep enough I am pretty sure we can find lowly ranked free European Uni grads finding their way to US working in Fund management Giant.

I do agree to this statement: "I personally think that so long you, have the quality the talent, plus a recognised degree, it would not be a problem for you to find your desire career."
We hire from the tops schools of the big economies. We don't use rankings. Can't go wrong.

US: MIT, Stanford, Ivies, Caltech, UCs + loads others
EU: Oxbridge, Imperial, LSE, ETHZ, ESSEC + loads others.
Japan: Tokyo, Kyoto,
China: Peking, Tsinghua, Fudan, Renmin (not too familiar)
India: IITs, IIM

If you are smart enough to get into the top schs of your country you must be good.
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Old 02-20-2009, 12:19 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spencer View Post
We hire from the tops schools of the big economies. We don't use rankings. Can't go wrong.

If you are smart enough to get into the top schs of your country you must be good.
+1 on that!
don't buy into the whole ranking business blindly. thought process is impt.

Last edited by patryn33; 02-20-2009 at 12:33 AM.
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Old 02-21-2009, 05:38 AM   #23
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Originally Posted by seeweiren View Post
It's great to hear view from other regions and continent

Well I cannot deny that Singapore is smaller than NYC and London, in terms of the economy. However, one cannot deny that Singapore is an influential country across Asia. Afterall, we are the fourth largest foreign exchange trading center right after UK,US and Japan.

There's a distinctive difference between "selective" and "reputation". I don't think that having selective admission criteria generally reflects a good reputation of the school. Though people might argue or believe that there is a correlation between Reputation and Selective admission.But Look at the Australia Universities or even some of the top tier universities in UK or US, having a easier entry admission does not mean that they do not have a good reputation. In fact Universities from the GO8 in Australia are rated as one of the top tier school around the world, like UNSW, University of Melbourne.

It's the same goes for the 3 local Universities, I am not saying that they are being selective or stringent towards admission criteria. But they do have a good reputation across of the world simply because of the intensive research and scholarly papers they produced.

If one really intend to look at the universities as a whole, THES has placed NUS or NTU in the top few place around the world.

Likewise, for SMU, SMU has been one of the "rising star" as noted by the media and throughout Singapore or even Asia. Being as an undergraduate student of SMU, I do not see myself inferior as compared to other top-notch universities in US or UK. This is simply because I strongly believe in the curriculam that is being used in SMU. There are graduates from SMU who actually work at US fund management giant such as Capital Group Companies in LA.Numbers might be kind of small in the case of SMU graduates working overseas. But i do know of a significant number of graduates being recruited by Offshore banks in Singapore as Investment or Private Banker. Simply because, if your Uni is situated in Singapore or Asia, you will definitiely have a deep knowledge of the situations and market in Asia.

I personally think that so long you, have the quality the talent, plus a recognised degree, it would not be a problem for you to find your desire career.
1. May you name some US / European universities with lax entrance criteria but good reputation? The ones that I have named in my previous posts are quite hard to get into

2. Ok great, but do you see SMU students as inferior if I place them with an MIT student? How about IQ level?
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Old 02-21-2009, 05:41 AM   #24
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Originally Posted by patryn33 View Post
+1 on that!
don't buy into the whole ranking business blindly. thought process is impt.
The key thing is, I sometimes suspect that the average student at Renmin is better than the average student at Duke, in terms of intelligence and perseverance. To be sure Duke is more employable, but the top Chinese grads that I have come across are so brilliant that they are scary. I think their IQ must be in the region of 140-150!! Not so for the other some good US unis like Duke, Brown, Columbia and others.
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Old 02-21-2009, 09:14 AM   #25
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The key thing is, I sometimes suspect that the average student at Renmin is better than the average student at Duke, in terms of intelligence and perseverance. To be sure Duke is more employable, but the top Chinese grads that I have come across are so brilliant that they are scary. I think their IQ must be in the region of 140-150!! Not so for the other some good US unis like Duke, Brown, Columbia and others.
Could be. However the content and exposure while at the different varsities can sometimes make the difference at the beginning of their careers.
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Old 02-21-2009, 11:03 AM   #26
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Quote:
There's a distinctive difference between "selective" and "reputation". I don't think that having selective admission criteria generally reflects a good reputation of the school. Though people might argue or believe that there is a correlation between Reputation and Selective admission.But Look at the Australia Universities or even some of the top tier universities in UK or US, having a easier entry admission does not mean that they do not have a good reputation. In fact Universities from the GO8 in Australia are rated as one of the top tier school around the world, like UNSW, University of Melbourne.
Yes, find us a school that has a very good reputation but yet isn't selective. The two usually go together. Otherwise, it would go somewhat against common sense, because you'd expect many applicants to flock to universities with good reputation and thereby pushing down the acceptance rate, which increases selectivity.

No, the Australian GO8 is not known around the world in the same way as America's HYPSM and UK's Oxbridge, for example. Can the average man in the street name just half the Australian GO8? Not me.

Of course, some target schools, like maybe half the Ivy League, can't be named by the average person either. But the average person will know the Ivy League, but not necessarily the GO8. Just because certain universities are best in their country doesn't mean they have a great reputation around the world.

Last edited by LockT31W; 02-21-2009 at 11:43 AM.
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Old 02-23-2009, 09:24 AM   #27
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Originally Posted by spencer View Post
We hire from the tops schools of the big economies. We don't use rankings. Can't go wrong.

US: MIT, Stanford, Ivies, Caltech, UCs + loads others
EU: Oxbridge, Imperial, LSE, ETHZ, ESSEC + loads others.
Japan: Tokyo, Kyoto,
China: Peking, Tsinghua, Fudan, Renmin (not too familiar)
India: IITs, IIM

If you are smart enough to get into the top schs of your country you must be good.
IITs, IIMs? These things don't even appear on international vocabulary. Your company must be very misgudied or too cliche and forgot to adjust to international dynamics.

Maybe you want to consider the University of Karachi? Ranked 500+, very good you know?
________
Kitchen Measures

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Old 02-23-2009, 11:40 AM   #28
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OK, I think there are two elements, two axes of comparison when you pit local against overseas schools.

1) Academic rigour and qualitiy of teaching
2) The "Experience"

So, let's start with (1). In general, I'd say the local schools are as rigorous (if not more so) than most other schools. I'm but a single data-point, but I for one know less about econometric regressions than my NUS honors Econ friends. Part of this is the flexibility of the US system, which let me study a wide variety of disciplines (so I wind up knowing a little bit about everything: enough to converse intelligently at a nice dinner, perhaps). And part of it is the demanding syllabi set out by local unis. As for quality of teaching, it's a toss-up since there are good and bad lecturers here and abroad. I decline to weigh in on that.

Regarding (2), going overseas is basically a super-expensive way to learn independence and maturity. Unless you have exceptionally cling-y parents who handhold you through everything even when you're half a planet away, you're going to have to fend for yourself while abroad. You have to get used to being a minority race, interacting with many different people who sometimes make very different (invisible) assumptions about life and value systems. You become a one-person family, and there are a hundred and one tiny things you have to take care of by yourself: pay your own rent, do your own laundry, vacuum your own room, file your own taxes, function in an alien system with invisible rules which Americans assume you already understand, wade through the university bureaucracy to get them to accept your A-level credentials, etc... All this, while studying and getting good grades, of course. These million tiny experiences can potentially make a person less spoilt, less cloistered, a little more thoughtful, a little more mature. That is the growth potential that comes with leaning into discomfort.

There are cheaper ways of gaining maturity, of course. Local schools have been highly aggressive in sending students abroad for exchange programmes. That is great. You can also travel, or make the effort to interact with the foreign students at your local university, instead of being confined 24/7 to your "comfort zone" of usual friends (don't abandon them either, though!). You can also step up your responsibility in the household: instead of making them clean up after you, help your parents run the household, find out how they file taxes, handle a mortgage, etc. You're soon going to be an adult, so it's worthwhile learning how to be a functional one! So if you can't afford to go overseas, there are always second-best ways of getting what you want (in this case, the maturing effect of the overseas "experience"), albeit in a more circuitous and effort-intensive way. But that is true for many things in life: the man who has less money must work harder on his own initiative, in order to achieve the same end-result as the man with money.
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Last edited by DukeBlue; 02-23-2009 at 11:52 AM.
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Old 02-24-2009, 01:04 AM   #29
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Originally Posted by Alex View Post
IITs, IIMs? These things don't even appear on international vocabulary. Your company must be very misgudied or too cliche and forgot to adjust to international dynamics.

Maybe you want to consider the University of Karachi? Ranked 500+, very good you know?
Another fool.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AKS_primality_test

The AKS primality test (also known as Agrawal-Kayal-Saxena primality test and cyclotomic AKS test) is a deterministic primality-proving algorithm created and published by three Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur computer scientists, Manindra Agrawal, Neeraj Kayal, and Nitin Saxena on August 6, 2002 in a paper titled PRIMES is in P.[1] The authors received many accolades, including the 2006 G

Prize and the 2006 Fulkerson Prize for this work.
The algorithm determines whether a number is prime or composite within polynomial time, and was soon improved by others. In 2005, Carl Pomerance and H. W. Lenstra, Jr. demonstrated a variant of AKS that runs in O(log6+ε(n)) operations where n is the number to be tested, a marked improvement over the initial O(log12+ε(n)) bound in the original algorithm [2].
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Old 02-24-2009, 01:10 AM   #30
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IITs are some of the most competitive schools to get into globally. They have very brilliant minds and most leading IT and banks go there to hire annually. Don't speak if you don't know anything, school kid.
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