BrightSparks Forum

Go Back   BrightSparks Singapore Scholarship & Higher Education Forum > University > Overseas > UK
Click Here if you forgot your password.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 12-14-2007, 01:28 PM   #1
tinyRedLeaf
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 25
tinyRedLeaf has a neutral reputation
Default Fun things to do while in UK

Everyone's asking about universities and scholarships. That's all fine and dandy. But remember, it's much, much more important to enjoy yourself no matter where you go. These will quite likely be the best years of your life. So go out there and get wreak havoc! You won't have such chances once you've started working.

I graduated from the UK, donkey years ago. And if you ask me, I learnt more from simply backpacking UK (it's calling rambling there) and Europe than from my lectures and tutorials.

(1)
Feel free to ask me about good trekking areas in the UK. Off the top of my head:
  • The Cotswolds
  • The Lake District
  • Yorkshire Dales
  • Scottish Highlands
  • The Isle of Skye: I loved this place! It's really one of those places you go to "get away from it all".

(2)
There is really no excuse to not backpack in the UK and Europe while you're still a student. Things will be so much cheaper, because you get student discounts for museums, galleries and other attractions. It'll also be so much easier to get 30-day rail passes, that grant you unlimited train travel with that period.

Speaking of trains, except for the UK, you can literally get anyway in Europe by train. (Trains are shite in the UK, but everyone tries their best to live with the horrible rail system.)

And I do mean everywhere. From a dusty, small town in Spain, all the way to Berlin in Germany. Further east, the former Eastern Bloc cities such as Budapest and Moscow awaits.

Most importantly, accomodation can be very cheap, provided you don't mind living on just bare necessities, ie bed, breakfast and a shower. There are youth hostels scattered over most parts of Western & Central Europe, most of them are generally well-maintained. Things can get a little dodgy once you've wandered into Eastern Europe. In which case, aim for budget hotels. Prices are generally very much cheaper in Eastern Europe, so budget hotels can actually turn out to be very economical.

Big travelling tip: Avoid travelling in early summer, ie, between June to August. EVERYONE will be travelling in that season, so you'd be competing for very limited accomodations. Best times to travel, in my opinion, are in early spring, eg, March to April or late summer, eg, September. September's great, because you still get plenty of sunshine, but very much lighter crowds.

The places I visited include:
  • Granada, Spain, to see the Alhambra.
  • Barcelona, Spain, to check out Gaudi architecture.
  • Florence, Italy. I spent almost a week here. Far too many art galleries to visit. The old town is very preeeetttiiiiieee. Especially at sunset.
  • Vatican City. Huge long queues to see the Sistine Chapel. It really has to be seen to be believed -- the sheer scale of Michaelangelo's work on the ceiling. It's awe-inspiring.
  • Venice, Italy. See it before it sinks! I'm not joking. The city floods regularly due to rising sea levels. When I was there, they were planning to build new flood gates further out in the lagoon. Don't know if that has materialised.
  • Amsterdam, Netherlands. It's best if you go there with very good friends. The city is famous for its special "cakes".
  • Salzburg, Austria. The hills are alive.....with the Sound of Music.... Actually, they weren't. But the chocolates here were lovely.
  • Munich, Germany. I wandered into the English Garden (it's a public park) and was promptly embarrassed to see nude sun-bathers everywhere.
    More importantly, I was there to see this nearby castle:

    Neuschwanstein Castle

(3)
My advice to anyone going to the UK (or anywhere in Europe) for studies. Go out to meet the locals. Why travel half-way around the world to meet more Singaporeans? You've three or possibly four years to learn how to "blend in". Don't waste it.

Last edited by tinyRedLeaf; 12-14-2007 at 01:32 PM.
tinyRedLeaf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2008, 12:41 PM   #2
LockT31W
Moderator
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 813
LockT31W has a neutral reputation
Default

tinyredleaf, were you on a scholarship? if you weren't, you must have been pretty rich to go backpacking around UK and europe. :P
LockT31W is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2008, 01:52 PM   #3
tinyRedLeaf
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 25
tinyRedLeaf has a neutral reputation
Default

Well, I was on F&M scholarship, so I guess you can say I'm privileged. But I'm far from being a rich man's son. And I still have to work hard to put food on my table.

That's the thing about being a student in Europe or the UK - travelling in Europe does in fact become very, very cheap. The Eurorail pass saved me a HUGE chunk in travelling costs. I paid less than 20 pounds a night for youth hostel accomodation in most places I visited. Spain has some of the best AND cheapest food in Europe. Once you get to Eastern Europe, the prices fall even lower.

(Of course, there is zero luxury. But you get what you pay for. The lack of luxury is part of the learning experience.)

Without a doubt, backpacking is definitely the way to see Europe on a shoestring budget. Plus, I personally believe you learn a lot more, by mingling with everyday people. In total, I only spent around 40 days travelling the continent, the first 10 days back in my first year as an undergrad, the other 30 days after I've graduated four years later.

I can't remember the exact figures any more, but I couldn't have spent more than $3,000 on the full-month trip. Any more and I would have felt really bad, since I wasn't spending my own money after all. Putting things in perspective, I've more than repaid what my parents had put up, but seriously, parents don't really think that way. They'd do whatever is best for you, if they can afford it.

So, if any of you are in a similar financial position (ie, F&M sponsorship), remember your moral obligations! It's no less important than if you were a scholar.
tinyRedLeaf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-2008, 11:24 PM   #4
BMSstudent
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 8
BMSstudent has a neutral reputation
Default

Hi, may I know what is this F&M sponsorship? would like to know more and what is the difference between this type of sponsorship and scholarship? what other sponsoship are there?

ps sorry for the many question.
BMSstudent is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2008, 12:12 AM   #5
LockT31W
Moderator
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 813
LockT31W has a neutral reputation
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BMSstudent View Post
Hi, may I know what is this F&M sponsorship? would like to know more and what is the difference between this type of sponsorship and scholarship? what other sponsoship are there?

ps sorry for the many question.
it means Father and Mother sponsorship
LockT31W is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-2008, 06:04 PM   #6
melsonchun
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 49
melsonchun has a neutral reputation
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BMSstudent View Post
Hi, may I know what is this F&M sponsorship? would like to know more and what is the difference between this type of sponsorship and scholarship? what other sponsoship are there?

ps sorry for the many question.
Lol, he hasn't heard of that before.
melsonchun is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-2009, 05:35 PM   #7
studygm
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 80
studygm has a neutral reputation
Default

I would suggest Savoy Place beside the river thames in London. It has a great library of resources for use especially if you are doing engineering related courses. The place is also rich in history with many great scientists who walked through the halls there before.
The restaurant there is also awesome and you can get some privileges/ discounts if you sign up as a member of some engineering society in UK.
__________________
Great tips at
MOD Ashearo EDIT: Link Removed. Read the rules!
studygm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2009, 07:11 PM   #8
profzhu
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: singapore
Posts: 81
profzhu has a neutral reputation
Default

imo, studying in england is a dream come true for football and backpacking fans.

you are free to tour europe without having to worry abt visas, passports, wadever. imgaine taking a tour bus down to barcelone and enjoying a champions league match with 100k other people ar nou camp, all screaming at the top of their voices. or watching a man utd or liverpool home game, singing glory glory man utd and u'll never walk alone with the die hard fans. dream come true man.

the only sad thing is that season tickets are very hard to get. must book online a couple fo years in advance followed by bidding for the tickets. so students going over to england will have trouble getting season tickets.

but there is always the black market!
profzhu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-2009, 12:11 PM   #9
dancheng
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 7
dancheng has a neutral reputation
Default

Some pointers to visit historical cities in England when one is there. Each place could be visited in a day trip.

(1) Oxford - see the old colleges and punt on the river
(2) Cambridge - see the old colleges and punt on the river
(3) Bath - see the Roman bath
(4) Chester - walk on top of the City Wall
(5) York - see the York Cathedral and the Castle Museum
(6) Strafford upon Avon - see Shakespeare's home and threatre
(7) Windsor - see the Queen's castle and palace, and Eton College

Just google for details, if you want to read more about them.

Last edited by dancheng; 07-03-2009 at 09:01 AM.
dancheng is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2010, 11:57 AM   #10
Lexlemd
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 43
Lexlemd has a neutral reputation
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyRedLeaf View Post
Well, I was on F&M scholarship, so I guess you can say I'm privileged. But I'm far from being a rich man's son. And I still have to work hard to put food on my table.

That's the thing about being a student in Europe or the UK - travelling in Europe does in fact become very, very cheap. The Eurorail pass saved me a HUGE chunk in travelling costs. I paid less than 20 pounds a night for youth hostel accomodation in most places I visited. Spain has some of the best AND cheapest food in Europe. Once you get to Eastern Europe, the prices fall even lower.

(Of course, there is zero luxury. But you get what you pay for. The lack of luxury is part of the learning experience.)

Without a doubt, backpacking is definitely the way to see Europe on a shoestring budget. Plus, I personally believe you learn a lot more, by mingling with everyday people. In total, I only spent around 40 days travelling the continent, the first 10 days back in my first year as an undergrad, the other 30 days after I've graduated four years later.

I can't remember the exact figures any more, but I couldn't have spent more than $3,000 on the full-month trip. Any more and I would have felt really bad, since I wasn't spending my own money after all. Putting things in perspective, I've more than repaid what my parents had put up, but seriously, parents don't really think that way. They'd do whatever is best for you, if they can afford it.

So, if any of you are in a similar financial position (ie, F&M sponsorship), remember your moral obligations! It's no less important than if you were a scholar.
Just like you, I will be under F&M sponsorship soon, guess I am going to Manchester for my architecture. But I have to agree, we only live life once and there is so much thing out there to see. Will seek your advice in the future for nice spot to travel
Lexlemd is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +8. The time now is 04:52 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.