BrightSparks Forum

Go Back   BrightSparks Singapore Scholarship & Higher Education Forum > University > Local > NUS
Click Here if you forgot your password.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 06-03-2010, 01:27 AM   #1
marcus
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: University Town
Posts: 62
marcus has a neutral reputation
Default NUS Faculty of Business (updated 2011)

MOD Ashearo Edit:

IGP FYI



Source: Mystique91

------------------------------------------------------------

Disclaimer: This post is currently undergoing restructuring, and may not reflect the latest figures or data. Please do your own research as well.
-------------------------------------------------------------

Dear interested applicants into the NUS Business School,

I am currently an undergraduate entering my 4th and Final Year, doing a Double Degree in Business (Finance) & Social Science (Economics).

I remembered that it was not an easy task choosing which Business School to go to. Each school certainly had its own unique proposition for me, and at the end of the day, I had to arrived at a decision. I exercised due diligence in my research, and to quote Vikram Pandit at Wharton's MBA commencement ceremony, chose a university "whose culture and values I was comfortable with".

I recognize that other people may base their decisions on a separate matrix from mine. I hope that my university experience, with a focus on my freshman year, will provide an insight into the undergraduate experience you may receive in NUS Business School.

I certainly hope that it will assist you in the decision-making process that I too faced back then. Feel free to PM me if you have further queries, but bear in mind that as I am often inundated with messages, I will only reply questions that have not been already covered here.

-------------------------------------------------------

1) Recognition - NUS is a renowned top-notch university, ranked 3rd in Asia in the recently announced QS AUR rankings. This facilitates the pursuit of both future education opportunities (MBA & PhD) and employment prospects in foreign countries. Our faculty's rankings are equally stellar as well. Rankings are certainly NOT everything (given how contentious they are), but bear in mind that some foreign universities only recognise an undergraduate degree that is 4 years and above.

2) Varsity Life - You are the master of your own destiny, and you structure it accordingly. For me, university life is about studying hard and playing hard at the same time, AND doing the things I always wanted to do. I joined various orientation camps where you really partied hard, got to make new friends and form lifelong friendships, and most importantly learn from the seniors. It was from such camps as well as networking sessions (e.g. Bizconnect) voluntarily organized by seniors in the school where I learnt countless tips such as the different approach needed to ‘tackle’ each module, as well as receiving past year notes from them. I am not so sure about the culture in other universities or faculties, but the seniors here are really helpful and even take the initiative to assist the students. This could perhaps be attested to our strong and cohesive spirit within the faculty – The Business School has consistently won the annual Rag and Flag among the many other faculties within NUS.

Subsequently, I took up leadership positions in the Business Faculty Club, AIESEC (the largest youth-led organization in the world), and in Hall. I wanted to have fun, gain leadership skills and contribute back to both the faculty as well as society just like how the many seniors before me had done. The highlight came in my second year, when I joined the NUS Student Union. I was immediately entrusted with the mandate of leading a 25 man team to expand NUS's matriculation discount card scheme that was responsible for over 35,000 undergraduates and staff members.

You may have different objectives from me, but you will be spoilt for choices since we have the luxury of having the most clubs and societies by virtue of the university’s critical mass.

3) Faculty Staff Members - You will always hear both positive and negative comments about staff members, be it NUS or any other universities in the world. But in my honest opinion, I have met really good lecturers and tutors who are extremely dedicated to their job and go the extra mile to help the students. Bear in mind that it is not merely a one-semester relationship between the students and the professors. Many of my peers, myself included, have enlisted the help of past lecturers to advise them in their Consulting Practicum (Think: Group work to advise a company) and final year Honors Thesis.

4) Overseas Exchange - There are many top-notch universities to choose from... and best of all... it is subsidized! Most of the students are eligible, and do in fact, go for an overseas exchange. Personally, I just came back from a very fulfilling exchange at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA. To say the very least, it was a huge eye-opener for me, experiencing a different kind of education pedagogy.

5) Internships - The career service office in our school has been actively sourcing for internships for the students. Indeed, we frequently get mailers inviting us to apply for top internships including Goldman, Deutsche, Bain and P&G, while the accounting students might also pursue internships at the Big 4. Not only do they do an excellent job in sourcing for these internship opportunities (almost every single student in the school will do at least one internship before graduating), but they also have frequent talks from various industry professionals as well as conducting interviewing clinics etc. Our career counselors devote their attention to every single student and nurture them to reach their full potential. Even the freshman are encouraged to apply for internships to companies which may be less glamorous than some traditional blue-chip firms, but provide them with good experience and leverage for future internship opportunities.

To attest to this fact, I will have done 5 bank internships during my three summers of university. I did FX and Fixed Income trading during my freshman year at an investment bank. Subsequently, I flew to Hong Kong during my sophomore year to intern with the same bank's Research team in Global Markets. This coming summer, I will be interning with the Global Markets arm of another investment bank in Hong Kong.

It was definitely not easy securing internship offers when you are fighting with students from the Ivys. To give you an idea regarding my penultimate internship application, I applied close to 200 internship positions and interviewed with all the major investment banks out there. Even despite securing the interviews, competition was especially tough given the economic climate of end-2011. For my upcoming internship role this summer, there were over 1000 applicants for just one position, and I had to go through 8 rounds of interviews. My school did an excellent job in preparing me for all my interviews by linking me up with our sizable alumni network working in the aforementioned firms. These seniors' advice definitely helped me to secure the number of internship offers I had for the summer.

At the end of the day, I think prospective students ought to recognize that by virtue of our cohort size (the smallest among the three local unis), there will not be as many "successful job-hunt stories" you hear coming from NUS Business vis-a-vis the other local unis. More importantly, it is the quality of the internship and percentage data that really counts.

6) Job opportunities - The statistics speak for themselves. We have the highest % of graduates who find a permanent job (edit: this was in 2010, I have not seen the latest statistics)

Last edited by marcus; 04-21-2012 at 04:26 AM.
marcus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2010, 01:27 AM   #2
marcus
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: University Town
Posts: 62
marcus has a neutral reputation
Default

7) Peers - All of your friends will be very competent and academically qualified - just like any other top Business Schools. The IGP are easily available so I will not elaborate. But what I will be pleased to add is that we have developed a strong and cohesive culture where the people are extremely friendly, and there is no backstabbing. As for stress, I personally feel that it is part and parcel of university life, and the key is how you manage it and how much you want to succeed. Trust me, the stress is nothing compared to what you will experience when you go out to work, especially in professions where you are hard-pressed to meet the bottom-line.

8) Curriculum Depth and Flexibility – I will give a brief description of the curriculum for you, just to give you all a rough idea of what to expect. You will all start off by doing a common core of modules that will take around 1.5 - 2 years, where you will obtain a wide range of general skill sets and knowledge. Subsequently, you will specialize in an area of interest (Finance, Marketing, Operations etc). Lastly, you have the further option to do a minor or another Major within the faculty (E.g. Accounting + Finance) or outside the faculty (Marketing + Economics) or even do more modules for your specialization than what is required. It really depends on whether you want to be extremely competent in your specialization area, or you prefer a broader but correlated set of skills. Furthermore, if you want to pursue other interests (or just simply adore studying), you can join the University Scholars Program, do a concurrent Masters, or join the double degree program where you will graduate with 2 degrees! Personally, I felt that both finance and economics are fields that are intricately woven, hence I am pursuing a double degree in Business and Economics.

For those who are wondering whether the curriculum emphasizes on projects or exams, or whether the outspoken tend to excel, I will say that it is pretty much a harmonious balance. It is of course a trade-off (no curriculum can emphasize on projects without sacrificing on a lower emphasis for the final year exams), but I personally feel that our school has achieved a pleasant balance. This ensures that students who excel in group work would not feel marginalized (as they would, should the curriculum over focuses on the final year exams). Nonetheless, in general, project work gets progressively more important when you start your specialization. Class participation is also important, but the focus is on quality answers and not mere blabbering, hence the result is that the students tend to offer quality answers and their peers will chip in with alternative arguments or build on to the previous suggestion.

9) Misc (Case competitions, Quizzes, Overseas Colleges, Study Trips etc) - You basically choose how you want to enrich your life further, if you are still not satisfied with co-curricular activities, internships and overseas exchanges. The business school provides numerous opportunities for you to do so through Case competitions which hone your presentation skills, Quizzes where you gain analytical skills and Overseas Colleges where you can embark on a one-year stint in top universities (e.g. UPenn, Stanford) to work for start-ups and learn from entrepreneurs, while studying at the same time. Lastly, there is a plethora of summer programs and study trips to choose from, both university-wide and faculty-specific. For example, I organized a China Business Study Trip (which was heavily subsidized and supported by the school), and participated in the inaugural Business Study Trip to the Middle East as well.

10) Alumni Network - The faculty places heavy emphasis on promoting long-lasting alumni relations as well as building our alumni network which dates back a long long way. So even when you graduate, the school still actively maintains contact with you, as well as encouraging frequent meet-ups and contact with not only your fellow peers, but with other alumni members as well.

11) Talks - Distinguished Alumni members, Members of the Management Advisory Board and visiting professors / guests frequently come to the faculty to give talks and share their experiences. Occasionally, the students even get to visit their work places! For example, I have had the recent opportunity to engage in a dialogue session with Mr Dhanabalan at Temasek Holdings.

12) Facilities – There are of course, a wide range of facilities available for the students in NUS. We have just moved to a brand new building with really great facilities. There is even a Center for Asset Management Research and Investments there, and it contains a trading lab!

Last edited by marcus; 06-03-2011 at 06:54 PM.
marcus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2010, 01:28 AM   #3
marcus
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: University Town
Posts: 62
marcus has a neutral reputation
Default

I have elaborated at length on the wonderful opportunities that you get by choosing the NUS Business School. But I must state that such opportunities do not come knocking on the door. The school puts in quite a bit of effort to make such opportunities available for the students, but at the end of the day, it is the onus on the students to plan his/her career path and take advantage of these opportunities. The school could provide a potpourri of internship opportunities, subsidize study trips, set up trading labs and organize dialogues, but the student must possess the initiative to discover and take advantage of these opportunities. Similarly, the school could forever emphasize on creating business leaders for the future, but you can only gain these skills by joining and leading various organizations and not through mere rote learning.

I have also received some requests to share on the unsatisfactory aspects / potential improvements for the NUS Business School.
I will be hard-pressed to share with you about the unsatisfactory aspects of our Business School. If you had asked me this same question before I chose NUS Business School, I would have readily stated oft-mentioned concerns such as:

‘Employees prefer SMU, we are introverted’ – My experience conversing with managers of some blue-chip companies in Singapore tells me that your future career success depends more on how you planned your career path and took advantage of the opportunities in university, rather than which university you come from. And I don’t think we are introverted, from my experience in classes where class participation marks can be significant. But although it can be competitive, I tend to see constructive answers rather than gibberish replies.

'Accounting degree not accredited because it is BBA (Accountancy)' - That is just not true. Our accountancy program goes through the same rigor as any other accountancy program by the local unis, and they have the same accreditation as well. It is unfortunate that the name of the degree conveys certain misconceptions, but the curriculum is no less rigorous

‘Much harder to maintain or pursue a double degree’ – I personally attest to this fact though. It is very competitive in the business school. But I knew what I wanted before I started school, hence I made sure I put in extra effort and sacrifices into attaining it.

‘Extremely competitive honors systems’ – Seniors have lamented to me that few ‘2-3%’ attain the holy grail of first-class honors, and second-upper is no less easier too. They compared this with UK where around 11% and 45% get the respective degrees. Personally, I have come to realize the value of a stringent honors system. I also know seniors who have graduated with first-class honors (so its possible!), and seniors who have graduated second-upper, but attain equal success in life due to their stellar leadership positions in various co-curricular activities.

‘Lack of focus of curriculum’ – In my honest opinion, few undergraduate degree curriculums will give you an in-depth knowledge for your future job. In the words of my current supervisor: “The things you learn here… you will never learn in school.” The school is only able to provide you with a reasonably specific curriculum – your future employees do not expect you to be an expert in the field because a lot of knowledge and information is company-specific or acquired through working experience. One possible way to perhaps address this issue would be to apply for internships in that particular field / read up on books (and I don’t mean textbooks!)

‘Old’ – You will only need to come and visit our brand new Mochtar Riady building to change your mindset immediately.

‘Lack of support from school’ – Please see my above replies

‘Over academic, irrelevant’ – Please see my above replies, I have stated that it is actually a healthy balance with a gradual progression to heavier emphasis on projects

‘Lack of reputable overseas exchange universities’ – You may be surprised to note that we have many reputable exchange universities. In fact, we also do go to many universities that the other local universities go to as well, and the students from the three local universities often go out together. More importantly, by virtue of our critical mass, we are able to provide more exchange opportunities for the students.

‘Horrible food’ – Culinary tastes is a very subjective issue, and I must profess that I do not frequent our Business canteen often. But there are a variety of options only a walk or a bus stop away! I often go to the FASS or Engineering canteen with my friends since I get easily bored with food.

I hoped I have adequately shared my first-year experience with you guys, and hopefully, it will give you a good idea of the opportunities and skills you will get, should you choose the NUS Business School.
At the risk of sounding bias or over patriotic, I can assure you that I have no intentions to do so (nor do I have any incentive as well). Sure, there are minor grouses here and there or potential improvements for the school, but then again, I would never choose a university which rests on its laurels and not actively upgrade and revamp itself in this dynamic business world.
What I will promise is that, as long as you have a good idea of what you want to achieve in your life and take the initiative to make use of the abundance of opportunities available so as to work towards your goal, you will never regret your decision just like I have never regretted mine.

Please feel free to PM me / post here if you have further queries, and I will do my best to answer them!

Last edited by marcus; 04-21-2012 at 03:45 AM.
marcus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2010, 01:29 AM   #4
marcus
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: University Town
Posts: 62
marcus has a neutral reputation
Default

By Jayax:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I've been following this thread for a couple months now. As a final yr student, perhaps i can help to quell some common misconceptions and contribute my views, especially with regards to employment opportunities etc. Hope this helps in your decision making.

FAQ (2011)

Q1. What value does an honours degree in business hold for me?

Before making any judgement calls, always ask yourself what an honours degree in business can do for you, and why you would want to pursue it in the first place.

Employment-wise, most structured graduate programs offered by the major foreign banks (RBS, BoA/Merril, DB, CS, UBS etc) and the more prestigious marketing/consultancy firms require at least a second-upper honours from their applicants. For the benefit of those of those who haven’t a foggiest what a structured program is, it’s a fast(er) track management training program for fresh graduates that rotates you around the company/bank, and usually comes with higher pay and promotion opportunities, albeit always subject to work performance of course. These are by and large the people whom a company/bank targets to fill future leadership positions. An example can be found here: http://www2.goldmansachs.com/careers...w-analyst.html

Having said that, an honours degree is not always strictly necessary for entrance into these programs, as I have personally heard of a few cases where exceptional applicants are offered jobs in their penultimate year in prestigious institutions. These people usually excel academically though, and more importantly, possess exceptional skills and qualities and/or have already distinguished themselves to the institution to the degree that it is understood they would have achieved at least a 2nd upper if they had chosen to complete their honours year. Thus, in this light, reading honours year can be seen to be optional if you view yourself (and employers view you) as part of this category.

If you’re thinking of starting work in the Public sector (eg MAS), then a 2:1 honours is usually a pre-requisite for acceptance.

Note that 2:1 honours usually comprises, on average, about 15% of a matriculating cohort in NUS business, while 1:1 honours usually makes up a mere 4-5%.

If you find yourself among the 2:2 honours graduating cohort, there is no need to be terribly worried either since the upper-mid-range institutions hire from this range as well for their structured programs. The majority of honours graduates from all 3 universities’ business faculties fall within this category.

If you are a third class honours holder, then (from what I’ve heard) you would have been better off not doing an honours degree at all as it does not reflect very well on you academically. The information in the next paragraph would better apply to you.

If you graduate without an honours degree, depending on your CAP, it is still very possible to find good employment in a very wide range of jobs, from HR/management to logistics etc in almost every industry. A business degree is ultimately a general degree, and as such can be used for employment almost everywhere.

At the end of the day, while academics do play a somewhat important part in landing a good first job, do keep in mind that ultimately it is your work ethic, personality, skill and performance that will set you apart from your peers, and these are probably better correlation factors for predicting long-term career success than pure academic results alone. Having said that, take note that there are many people who do well academically who possess the above traits as well.

Q2. Reading Honours at NUS is contingent on grades (CAP > 3.5) while NTU offers a direct honours system. Since NUS is a 4-year course and NTU’s is 3 years, why would anyone choose NUS over the latter?

One major distinguishing factor would the brand name. Having participated in the student exchange program and studied in a foreign university/ lived in a foreign land for the better part of a year, I am of the opinion that the NUS brand does pull more weight internationally, among academics, employers, and the collective international consciousness, and is more well-known/visible than the other 2 local unis. I’m saying this as a matter of fact, and am not implying that NUS is intrinsically ‘better’ than SMU/NTU.

This advantage may be simply be due to the fact that NUS has been around for a longer time than the other two unis, thus giving it a significant first-mover advantage. To better illustrate this logic, consider how NUS Law and SMU Law measure against each other when the latter has not had a very long time to build up its brand or reputation. In addition, NUS was (and is) a research university, and thus has had a good 30-year or so lead in which to flood international mainstream research journals with articles published by its academics, thus contributing to better international brand awareness.

Having said that, local employers do not discriminate much between the three local unis as all three are known locally for churning out good quality graduates. However, if part of your aspirations (or possible future career routes) include working overseas or being hired by foreign employers, the brand name advantage alone may help in securing that first interview (after which your interview skills etc would come into play). Lastly, it is probable that as the other two universities churn out more and more graduates who work overseas, over time, brand recognition for NTU/SMU may reach the point of equivalency, but I think I can safely say that that is not yet the case as of this point in time.

Another factor would be furthering your studies on a graduate level. Most quality American MBA programs (NYU Stern, Uni Penn Wharton etc) prefer (if not outright require) a 4-year undergraduate program in their applicants ( http://www.mbaonlineprograms.net/mba...-students.html ) so if you’re planning on furthering your studies at a quality MBA program, a 3-year direct honours degree may not be the best choice. This is an especially relevant factor given the increasing requirements for an MBA to be promoted into top management positions in many institutions. For many, this may be the most important reason for choosing a 4-year program over a 3-year one, since it does have a very real and direct impact on your access to quality post-graduate education, and by extension, your future career trajectory.

After taking into consideration the added value of a good MBA, it may actually more than make up for the one-year's pay advantage that NTU grads enjoy in their 1st yr, especially since pay raises tend to be non-linear and scale better at senior managerial positions, vis junior positions. For eg, a 5% annual increase when at 10,000/month translates to a larger absolute amount than a 5% increase when you're earning 2800/m, and the real percentage increase when you're senior management tends to be higher as well due to larger accumulated bonuses (which are calculated on a monthly pay basis, eg 5 month's bonus etc). If you were to do a simple time value calculation with a modest discount (reinvestment) rate of 4% p.a, you will find that the break even point tends to be around just under ~8-9 years after you start working, after which you would be increasingly better off. I'm sorry if i'm getting too technical here, but i'm trying to use calculation to show how a short-term 1 year salary lead may not necessarily translate to making you better off in the long run.

Lastly, from personal experience, an accelerated undergraduate program (ie, 3 years) may not always be in your best interests if you’re intending to major in a technical specialisation such as finance.
The NUS curriculum requires 6 different modules/topics in finance that give you good breadth and depth / good working knowledge of almost every field of finance, enabling you to better experience and decide which field you enjoy the most and would want to work for in the future. I would say that this is one of the strengths of the NUS curriculum, as (speaking from first-hand experience) content learned in academic finance is usually also content that can be applied on-the-job, and which employers appreciate. Accelerating this content into a 3-year course may be suitable for some people, but overall I am of the opinion that for the average person it is well worth tackling the topic at a manageable pace in order to achieve both breadth and depth, which are ultimately value-added elements.

Q3. NTU published a ranking that ranks it higher than NUS, does that mean it is better?

As with all rankings, it is good to keep some perspective, such as which organisation does the ranking etc. Both NUS/NTU business schools tend to publish rankings that place them above each other on that particular ranking scale by that particular ranking organisation, and since it is not feasible nor accurate to count the number of superior rankings each school has achieved by numerous organisations (NUS has more anyway due to its MBA program) as a measure of the school’s quality, this point may not be a very good way to compare them. For an example of what I mean, click on the ranking links below:

http://rankings.ft.com/businessschoo...y-of-singapore
http://www.nbs.ntu.edu.sg/Corporate/...editation.aspx

Conclusion

I’ve tried to be as fair and objective as I can in this post, and have prefaced (or suffixed) which parts are my personal opinion and which parts are regarded as fact. I hope that this helps future applicants in their decision making process, and finally lays to rest the perennial 3-year direct honours vs 4-year optional honours quandary.

Last edited by marcus; 06-03-2011 at 06:05 PM.
marcus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2010, 01:33 AM   #5
marcus
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: University Town
Posts: 62
marcus has a neutral reputation
Default

Testimonial of twentythree in 2009

"I am in my sophomore, going into my junior year, previously was from another local university before making the leap of faith and joining nus bschool. Just wana share my thoughts and my experience i was so blessed with and answer any questions you guys and girls might have.

5 modules, usually 5 group and/or individual projects, they can range from individual industrial journal based research projects or group projects that culminates in your presentation and report. over 16 hours of classes a week usually or more if ya in the usp program, which hones your critical and analytical abilities. lectures are only for foundation, level 1000 modules, but the beauty is that at times we have extremely brilliant faculty members sharing with all 300 rather than just limiting it to 40. its not cost effective to hire 10 equals to do it seminar style especially when it is more effective doing foundation modules lecture styled. Subsequently more close quarters interaction is done at tutorials. Level 3000 or higher level modules are taught seminar style in every world class bschool, including all 3 of our local ones. its not the easiest program in singapore, you have to take the longest to graduate with honors, you have to take the most electives, core modules and the workload is without doubt different in scope and scale. even our accountancy program is almost like a double degree in a single program. so why so tough? its training you to be up for it in the real world, not almost, but ready to hit the ground running and get the experience clocked in. the most fabled ivy leagues, bschools in eu and us have similar rigor and they dont shorten their programs or remove items, they demand the very best because everyone, nus, berkeley, oxbridge, wharton all have a reputation to uphold. heck the employers recognise the value of a nus degree, honors or not, when the non-honors students can get paid more and more get employed full time than their peers who might have honors from other programs. So reputation, rigor and intensity, definitely check.

internships wise, the bschool's fabled career services office whips the freshmen into shape as they go through their 3-4 years, from dress sense to speech to interview techniques and assessment centres (similar to what you guys who went through the nus bschool scholarship interviews) i myself was privileged to have been with nike singapore and south east asia at the advertising and digital marketing division. Yes i met the national team footballers, australian team when they were her, celebrities. Beyond that as an intern i was given the responsibility to come up with my very own project and campaign. over 1,500 freshmen were in the program and found out first hand what nike is all about.

I also spent summer in Beijing, China at a leading investment bank and private equity firm on an approximately half a billi listing in the ecm division. doing research, due diligence work on deals and actual due diligence at sites. The experience of meeting the ministry party secretary and business titans in beijing was priceless as you would imagine. All these with the support and guidance from our career services office. career development - check

well all that curricula and no fun makes life a bore arnt it. But hang on, i was also elected as the project director of a freshman orientation camp in bschool, over 100 organizing team members, 200 freshmen, BlackBerry, Nike, L'Oreal, Reds and couple other organizations as the camp's sponsors and partners, it was something truly unforgettable for those in the class of 2008. The best part was, during the pre-camp briefing we had joanne peh coming over to school for as part of the nike orientation around campus. The finale saw everyone enjoying themselves at timbre at the arts house. yes all these by students. - school life, definitely check, even the calibre and scale and prestige of their student government is unparalleled from what my other peers tell me.

Hang on, there is still somemore indelible experiences that nus bschool has afforded me. very importantly, upholding our school's fabled history and reputation as the very best case school from singapore, seniors preceding us has won numerous events from usc marshall, copenhagen, hong kong science and technology, mcgill, the fabled L'Oreal local and international champions. together with a team of 3 other school mates, with zero international experience but rigorous training by our mentor and excellent faculty advisor, we came in 2nd in mcgill in 2009 <www.mmicc.org/2009> the weekends spent and the time preparing was immensely worth it in the end. It sort of shocked us that all the power house bschools (haas, marshall, copenhagen, auckland, mcgill etc.) all are wary of the reputation and calibre of nus teams, which is typical and very normal considering the mcgill teams coming here have placed or won 5 out of 9 times in the history of the competition! It was truly an eye opener and made me realise how we singaporeans tend to put ourselves down and we fail to see our strengths and how we are really, not very different from the rest. - more international exposure, check.

so lastly, one of the most dynamic and demanding projects undertaken was something completely voluntary and selected for the very best. In collaboration with KPMG and The Business Times, nus bschool was the only exclusive partner who sent out teams of 3-4 students to Singapore's top 50 SMEs across various sectors to conduct research, diagnostic consulting and subsequently come back with their findings and research to do a presentation to the ceo/director of the company. i could clearly remember working on the project on the flight on my way to canada in that same semester, the sheer amount of work put in to ensuring our research are not just academic and works on paper only. it has got to be accurate, real and reflective of the organization. fluff, what fluff? any crap that is acceptable else where obviously cannot hold water in the real world. beyond academics it was the real world, not just preparing for it, but already doing it and trying to do it to the best of our abilities. - not just preparing for the real world, but already in the midst of the real world - check

4 semesters on, despite being a year behind my peers, to quote green day, "yes thank you, i really am having the time of my life"

- its not where that makes you the next person who makes an impact, its how much you want to make that impact."

Last edited by marcus; 06-03-2011 at 06:07 PM.
marcus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2010, 12:17 PM   #6
marcus
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: University Town
Posts: 62
marcus has a neutral reputation
Default

-reserved for future replies-
marcus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-2010, 05:12 PM   #7
marcus
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: University Town
Posts: 62
marcus has a neutral reputation
Default

Latest!

Indicative Grade Profile for NUS/NTU/SMU for 2010/2011 (10th Percentile)

NUS NTU SMU
Accountancy AAA/A AAB/A AAB/B
Business AAB/A AAB/B ABB/C
Accountancy 3.81 3.65 3.76
Business 3.73 3.64 3.62

Last edited by Ashearo; 10-22-2010 at 11:22 PM.
marcus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2010, 09:25 PM   #8
jeremy90
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 10
jeremy90 has a neutral reputation
Default

Hmm seems like the intake for nanyang business school is even larger than business school like smu.
Intakes:
Nus (acct): 176
Smu(acct): 258
Ntu (acct): 635

Nus (biz): 436
Smu (biz): 699
Ntu (biz): 608
jeremy90 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2011, 04:33 AM   #9
marcus
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: University Town
Posts: 62
marcus has a neutral reputation
Default

Dear all,

NUS will be having its open house from 12-13 March 2011 (Sat - Sun).

The NUS Business School will be represented by a huge contingent of passionate undergraduates (we only get paid a nominal fee).

If you are unsure of whether NUS, or NUS Business School is for you, this is a good opportunity to ask seniors about their experiences, as this will be the best way for you to make an informed choice.

I will be there as well (Saturday 9am-1pm), so you can PM me if you want to discuss more about making your choice.

Alternatively, you can PM me to discuss it via the message system as well!

Regards,
Marcus
marcus is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +8. The time now is 11:57 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.