BrightSparks Forum

Go Back   BrightSparks Singapore Scholarship & Higher Education Forum > University > Overseas
Click Here if you forgot your password.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-08-2013, 10:11 PM   #1
Strta
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 2
Strta has a neutral reputation
Default Which country/uni should I go to?

Hey all, I just collected my A Level results last Friday, and despite doing rather decently (straight A's except a B for H2 Lit), right now I'm completely lost. I've no idea what I wanna do or where I want to go. I'm interested in Economics, but after reading about the hectic, stressful life of a banker, I don't want to pursue a career in that field, which rules out one major career option for someone with an Econs degree.

To get to the point, I'm pretty keen on going overseas to pursue my university education, with or without a scholarship. My options are the usual -Australia, UK, USA and Canada. I much prefer the way of life and teaching style in these countries, but I've no idea where to go.

I'm not going to take SATs, which as far as I know, rules out the American option. Wherever I go to, I'm rather keen on migrating there after university. What I'm worried about is that should I study in, say, Australia, I might change my mind about migrating there and my degree won't be as recognised in other countries.

Essentially, I'd dearly appreciate all perspectives on studying in these few of countries, and in fact, any other country. Thanks for your time, and looking forward to your replies!
Strta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2013, 12:11 AM   #2
pepsicap
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 34
pepsicap has a neutral reputation
Default

I don't know much about the advantages/disadvantages of studying in various countries though.

UK - minimal financial aid offered, and it is very difficult to stay on for a job after you have gotten your degree. Some universities such as Imperial offer a scholarship of 5k pounds per year to the students with the best academic achievements, but you shouldn't count on it when making your plans.

Australia - Wage level is very high, but very high cost of living too.

Canada - Not too sure about it, although I am aware that there is a large Chinese community in Vancouver.

Degree recognition-wise, it really depends on which university you go to. Assuming your 'straight A's' include 3H2 A's (implying you took a 4H2++ subject combination), you are most likely to be able to get into most good universities without much problem (UCL, etc), which means you don't need to worry about recognition, as they are pretty much known to good employers around the world. For the highly competitive schools such as Oxbridge, the Ivies and other top US schools, however, will still require some sort of "x-factor" that differentiates you from other straight A students (especially amongst Asians).

Also, another reason why you don't need to worry about recognition is because you aren't taking a professional degree. Economics is not a professional degree and is a rather flexible one in fact, that varies greatly depending on which university you go to. For example UChicago, Cambridge and LSE are 'homes' to different schools of thought. If you are intending to take law, medicine or even engineering, you have to take note of the countries which recognize your degree and hence allow you to practice professionally there.

Lastly, I have no idea why you don't want to take the SATs. From your post I am guessing you are intending to take a gap year, since UK admissions have already closed earlier on this year, on 15 Jan, so your next chance to apply would be either next year, or using UCAS clearing (which isn't an option for most of the top universities if I am not wrong). Since you have so much time, and if you really want to keep your options open, it wouldn't be too much of a hassle to do your SAT1s and possibly your SAT2s in preparation for the next US admissions cycle.

US universities offer some of the most diverse undergraduate environments, which range from smaller and more closely-knit Liberal Arts Colleges, to full-size private universities to even larger public universities, from the liberal and sunny West Coast to the colder and possibly more 'snobbish' and affluent East Coast where the Ivies are (as well as many more good schools in in between). And you can apply to as many of them as possible, which makes US a really suitable target destination if you want your options and have so much time on your hands.

Your immediate objectives would be to check out when the application cycles for Australian and Canadian universities open. You can start preparing your applications for UK and US applications from approximately Sept or August onwards, and their deadlines are 15 Jan next year and 1 Jan respectively (varies across US universities, but centred on 1 Jan). Once you get your game plan sorted out, then start working on it.

Good luck

Last edited by pepsicap; 03-09-2013 at 12:14 AM.
pepsicap is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2013, 12:36 PM   #3
mishieru07
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 107
mishieru07 has a neutral reputation
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Strta View Post
Hey all, I just collected my A Level results last Friday, and despite doing rather decently (straight A's except a B for H2 Lit), right now I'm completely lost. I've no idea what I wanna do or where I want to go. I'm interested in Economics, but after reading about the hectic, stressful life of a banker, I don't want to pursue a career in that field, which rules out one major career option for someone with an Econs degree.

To get to the point, I'm pretty keen on going overseas to pursue my university education, with or without a scholarship. My options are the usual -Australia, UK, USA and Canada. I much prefer the way of life and teaching style in these countries, but I've no idea where to go.

I'm not going to take SATs, which as far as I know, rules out the American option. Wherever I go to, I'm rather keen on migrating there after university. What I'm worried about is that should I study in, say, Australia, I might change my mind about migrating there and my degree won't be as recognised in other countries.

Essentially, I'd dearly appreciate all perspectives on studying in these few of countries, and in fact, any other country. Thanks for your time, and looking forward to your replies!
You don't have to go into banking just because you do Economics (although I think that's what most people would do just because it has an absurd pay scale). Econs is a really flexible degree - I don't do it myself but I imagine that you could go into plenty of careers from consultancy to analyst to working for the UN/ NGOs (with a postgrad degree)

If you're worried about brand recognition, I'd stick to well-known universities (eg Oxbridge + Russell Group in UK, G8 in Aus). Considering you have a very decent set of grades, you should be getting in to such schools. You could cross-reference the university rankings, but I'd take them with a huge pinch of salt.

Your last question is really vague. I currently study in the UK - what exactly do you want to know about? How my course is structured? What I do during term time and the holidays? Would I do the same thing in retrospect? It would be more helpful if you could nail down specific questions.

Edit: Adding on to what pepsicap has said, the admissions deadline for Oxbridge is 15 Oct every year so if you're interested, make sure you get everything in on time! For everything else, it's 15 Jan. No idea about Aus and Can unis though, so can't help you there.

Last edited by mishieru07; 03-09-2013 at 12:39 PM.
mishieru07 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2013, 10:03 PM   #4
patryn33
Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: not in SG!!!
Posts: 940
patryn33 has a neutral reputation
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Strta View Post
I'm not going to take SATs, which as far as I know, rules out the American option. Wherever I go to, I'm rather keen on migrating there after university. What I'm worried about is that should I study in, say, Australia, I might change my mind about migrating there and my degree won't be as recognised in other countries.
Not taking SAT that rules out alot of Top American uni. A handfull of great Uni does not require SAT.

on the topic of Migration - Econ/Biz is hard in UK even if U armed with a LSE Msc degree. ppl I know of return to SG or went to HK. is HK the country u wanna go?

Australia is tightening its regulation. without a few yrs of working experience its not easy. I have heard ppl that went to UofMelb biz honors majoring in finance are all hired locally.Not sure how true is that.

Canada gives one 3yr work VISA upon graduation. Finding work is another matter. Today even in Calgary/Edmonton/Windsor/Montreal U can find a large chinese population. Alot of PRC coming there as with canadian citizenship they can get into US to work easily.

Canada, UK (iirc) and OZ U can apply for PR on your own unlike USA.

USA - undergrad Biz/Econ is hard. it really depends on luck. otherwise like most PRC they just move on to to Phd! look for job while they are working on the Phd. found 1 and quit Phd program with a Masters. USA pathway to greencard maybe the hardest, U need company to sponsor. they may not want to apply immediately many ppl sit with their limited 6yrs work VISA for 3-5yrs before application starts. bach degree only can go under EB3 which may takes a good 10yrs to get your greencard. a degree in Econ/Biz at masters level also falls under EB3. only Sci/Engineering masters falls under EB2 which only takes 1.5yrs.
patryn33 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +8. The time now is 06:16 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.