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Old 03-20-2013, 10:54 AM   #1
kitkat123
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Question HELP!overseas or local (chemistry)

Hi guys!I really need some advice on my decision to study chemistry in uni.
I am actually more interested in the medicinal chemistry course rather than straight chemistry.

I got offers from imperial, ucl, kings and Warwick to study medicinal chem.
My first choice was imperial..but I did not meet the conditional offer.
So now, im debating whether I should head overseas, or just stick to nus, college of science.

if i go UK, I will get a Msci degree for medicinal chemistry
If I go nus, there is a risk that I dont get into the applied science course as this is only started in year 2.
Also, how difficult is medicinal chemistry as a subject?

would also ask about the job prospects of taking this degree in Singapore.
Sorry for the lengthy post..but I really need some advice.
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Old 03-20-2013, 11:08 AM   #2
savethewow
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kitkat123 View Post
I got offers from imperial, ucl, kings and Warwick to study medicinal chem.
My first choice was imperial..but I did not meet the conditional offer.
So now, im debating whether I should head overseas, or just stick to nus, college of science.
if i go UK, I will get a Msci degree for medicinal chemistry
if money is not an issue and you aim is to get a masters, then definitely go overseas. especially since you've got offers from very good schools, even without imperial.
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Old 03-20-2013, 12:20 PM   #3
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I usually don't look at rankings but the UK universities (except imperial) seem to fall significantly behind NUS. With NUS global reputation, I don't think you have a problem finding work in Singapore or overseas. Still, I agree with savethewow, the overseas exposure is good if you have the money.

If you want to be a researcher, a Ph.D is a must. If you do well in NUS for your bachelor's, you can skip M.Sc and study Ph.D. I have known people who took this path but... the difficulty is very subjective.
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Old 03-20-2013, 01:15 PM   #4
kitkat123
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pokkaGT View Post
I usually don't look at rankings but the UK universities (except imperial) seem to fall significantly behind NUS. With NUS global reputation, I don't think you have a problem finding work in Singapore or overseas. Still, I agree with savethewow, the overseas exposure is good if you have the money.

If you want to be a researcher, a Ph.D is a must. If you do well in NUS for your bachelor's, you can skip M.Sc and study Ph.D. I have known people who took this path but... the difficulty is very subjective.

I did check the rankings too and I agree that it should not be the main consideration why I would want to go overseas. However, I have to admit that it is one of the reasons why I am hesitating to take up the offer..that is by QS rankings right? I checked times too and it is different for life science. What can I do with a degree like this? Is it open to other areas instead of the pharma industries?

Anyway thanks for the replies guys!! I agree with savethewow that these Unis are good, but im not sure for chemistry though..
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Old 03-20-2013, 07:38 PM   #5
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I don't look at Times Higher Education rankings for undergraduate studies because they look more on research output than teaching quality. QS is better because they rank by specific subjects but I don't know their ranking methodologies. At the very least, a high ranking university means 'you can't go wrong in this university'.

I have know idea why everybody looks at career pathways by industry... I see it differently. For science graduates, there are three paths: teaching, industry, or research. Teaching is self-explanatory and you can always, always, fall back to teaching if industry/research doesn't suit you.

For industry, a Bachelor's degree will do but a Master's degree is encouraged if you want (greater) specialization. Your work will be determined by your bosses and most of time, you only improve stuff like an old patented drug about to expire.

For research, you need at least need a Ph.D. Post-doc is cool but it is up to you. I also heard of Master's graduates doing research and publishing papers but they stop at Master's because they like the amount of research they do. A researcher has greater freedom in doing what he/she wants to do. Sometimes, the problem is funding. I heard of doctorates complaining they are chasing funds more than researching. That is why a Ph.D from a reputable university is very important for researchers-to-be.

If you are unsure or even more confused after what I wrote... study a normal chemistry degree or chemical sciences (http://www.chemicalscience.nus.edu.sg/index.htm). It allows you to choose your specializations later when you gained a greated understanding of chemistry.

Last edited by pokkaGT; 03-20-2013 at 07:47 PM. Reason: grammer
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Old 03-20-2013, 08:14 PM   #6
kitkat123
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I understand what you are trying to say.
But, I am really quite passionate about medicinal chemistry.
What do you mean by a normal chemistry degree?
you mean a bsc in chemistry?

if i go into nus, and get into honours, wouldnt i have to specialise as well?
by choosing the 3 similar fields they provide which are similar to the specialisations in the uk?

so you are more inclined towards taking NUS chemistry right?
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Old 03-20-2013, 09:13 PM   #7
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1) Yes. B.Sc in chemistry.

2) Precisely. You specialize later in your honours year.

3) Im not a chemistry pro but I think specializations (in whatever field) only have their meaning when you do a big research project on it. Not so much on the modules you studied. I admit that those modules might help, a little, in your research.

4) I guess I am more inclined to recommend studying a general chemistry degree first. I have many friends and fellow students who chose very specialized degrees but wish they had more flexibility. However, I have also seen very talented students who are driven by their Passion.

If I were you, I would choose NUS and get out for my post grad! I would much rather spend the money on BETTER universities like MIT.
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Old 03-20-2013, 10:00 PM   #8
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A Bach grad can also publish papers.
There is no such thing as skipping masters to phd maybe a English thing.
Phd in UK is generally a 3 yr program, student get to audit class to help research. After publishing a big paper one grad.
I don't recall those going in with a masters get 1yr off from phd program under the queens system.

USA - phd is like 5-6yr program. One have to take masters coursework, then take a qualifying exam. Fail twice and u are out (attrition rate maybe low at 20% or high at 90%) if u neg a deal with prof u can grad with masters, else u get no paper. During those times u may have publish at least 1 paper. Most ppl do get 2 or more papers out.
For masters student changing a uni to do phd, in most case credits are not transferable one is expected to do the full program.

I didn't like QS, I like SHJT better but it's more research oriented. Good for those who wanna do research. Teaching quality is a very subjective measurement. There are loads of debate on which ranking make sense, at the end of the day u need to get some to hire u. U can choose to state your uni ranking in your résumé, as long as the employer buy that great. Iirc our local ivy is ranked higher than some ivy but I doubt ppl out there really buy that at the end of the day.

With our local uni, only the cream get to do research in their final yr. UK not heard of ppl doing research in their undergrad. USA prof promote research, not uncommon to find undergrad working with phd students on research.

Last edited by patryn33; 03-20-2013 at 10:25 PM.
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Old 03-20-2013, 10:29 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kitkat123 View Post
I got offers from imperial, ucl, kings and Warwick to study medicinal chem.
My first choice was imperial..but I did not meet the conditional offer.
.
They are all conditional offer? When u said got offer but didn't meet offer condition is much like not having a offer. Any unconditional?
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