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Old 01-07-2009, 12:11 AM   #11
Pulse0011
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Actually I screwed up my studies in the earlier years and I'm currently undergoing a Diploma with SIM finishing in June. Assuming I do a law foundation starting next year, by the time I'll be able to graduate and practice in Singapore I would be about 31-32 already. I really don't know if it's worth it to study till that age. Doing the math, a first-year law associate Singaporean male would be around 26, so I'll be like 5 to 6 years behind them.

ps: thanks for replying
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Old 01-07-2009, 12:30 AM   #12
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I think if law is really your dream career, then you definitely have to go for it. Starting late is better than not starting it at all. The only concerns would be your finances and your family: would you be able to afford it the tuition while living on your savings or working part-time for 3 or 4 years? would your spouse be supportive of it? need to support your parents? These are some valid concerns I can think of.

If you consider from a mainly financial perspective, then it'll really depend on how good you are as a lawyer. If you're good enough to make partner in a successful law firm, then we can talk about millions in disposable income over a few years. If you can't make Partner, being an Associate pays very well too - after a few years you'll be safely making maybe at least 7k. 7k a month is more than what many other people make even at the end of their careers. so the chances are that, either way, in the long run a law career would be more financially rewarding than any salaried career you can have with a Diploma. of course, if you strike it out on your own and set up a successful business then you can potentially earn money beyond a lawyer's wildest dreams.

What are you exact concerns regarding age? If you are accepted to a law firm, you'll be rewarded for your performance on an equal basis as anyone who starts out along with you, regardless of age. If you're concerned just because you're older than everyone else, then it might just be your own mindset about age and I don't think it's valid enough to stop you from pursuing your dreams.
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Old 01-07-2009, 12:45 AM   #13
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My main concern is/was the age thing, and also getting into law school which is such a headache, been to a few overseas education placement agents, all say have to start from scratch, then I found out about the 1 year law foundation in UK, which is probably the safest route I found so far. No spouse, only girlfriend, so no worries in that area. Family very supportive. Apart from all that, I really really want to be a lawyer.
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Old 01-07-2009, 09:16 AM   #14
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There are several foundation programmes that can lead you into Year 1 Law. Duration is normally about 8 months, success rate over 98%. Happy to provide details, please check your private message.
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Old 01-23-2009, 12:16 AM   #15
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I have several friends who are graduate LLB students in NUS Law School. One is a Political Science degree student, doing LLB now, he's 26 years old, in Year 2. Another classmate of mine is 28, he studied in JC, took a degree in NUS, and taught in Polytechnic before coming to Law School.

I don't think it is a problem to do study LLB as a graduate student. If anything these graduates tend to do better, most likely because they have more experience in studying, and more maturity in thinking.
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Old 01-23-2009, 09:03 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zyvroklsayt View Post
I have several friends who are graduate LLB students in NUS Law School. One is a Political Science degree student, doing LLB now, he's 26 years old, in Year 2. Another classmate of mine is 28, he studied in JC, took a degree in NUS, and taught in Polytechnic before coming to Law School.

I don't think it is a problem to do study LLB as a graduate student. If anything these graduates tend to do better, most likely because they have more experience in studying, and more maturity in thinking.
Need a good GPA to get in.
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Old 01-24-2009, 03:20 AM   #17
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Just to clarify, Graduate LL.B Programme is a 3-year course and you need a good first degree to get in. So your friend who's 26 year old and is in Year 2, did he finish his 1st degree at 24? Means he finished that in 3 years also?
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Old 02-03-2009, 03:51 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zyvroklsayt View Post
I have several friends who are graduate LLB students in NUS Law School. One is a Political Science degree student, doing LLB now, he's 26 years old, in Year 2. Another classmate of mine is 28, he studied in JC, took a degree in NUS, and taught in Polytechnic before coming to Law School.

I don't think it is a problem to do study LLB as a graduate student. If anything these graduates tend to do better, most likely because they have more experience in studying, and more maturity in thinking.
could anyone tell me what the standards are to get in through the graduate route?
what's the average gpa one should have in order to have a chance to get accepted?

Maybe Zyvroklsayt could share how well his friends did to get into the course.

thanks!
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Old 10-12-2011, 08:50 PM   #19
deer
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hey would like to know more about the foundation programmes. could you send me a pm? you're inbox is full!

thanks a lot!

Quote:
Originally Posted by iDeAs View Post
There are several foundation programmes that can lead you into Year 1 Law. Duration is normally about 8 months, success rate over 98%. Happy to provide details, please check your private message.
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Old 11-18-2011, 08:20 PM   #20
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Am planning to enroll as a part timer for diploma in legal executive at tp poly...which means my career would be charted towards paralegal .... is there any way that this would be accepted by institutions here to do a law degree in order to be certified as a practising lawyer...

I am more interested in assisting lawyer in legal research rather than be a practising lawyer...

However, paralegal profession seems to be fading these days..
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